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Hatching Conures. - Page 4

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by broody rooster View Post

hm that's strange they'd do that ...

It's a fairly common problem with the parrot species in captivity.
post #32 of 39

do you know if there is a way to get the bonded dove to go broody?

post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by broody rooster View Post

do you know if there is a way to get the bonded dove to go broody?

Do you have a male dove? Your hen can not brood without a male as male and female take turns brooding eggs. Usually the hen broods at night and then take turns with the male during the day so each have time to eat, drink, and exercise.

If this hen was raised by doves and not hand fed she will mate with a male dove.
Edited by nchls school - 11/21/15 at 5:55pm
post #34 of 39

she thinks im her mate is the problem with that she coos at me flys to me and has um ..presented herself to me on numerous occasions so is there a way to get her to incubate eggs when i'm her mate or is there no point in trying this ? i dont know if theres a specific age id imagine shes not a whole year old yet as shes only laid eggs once before which is how the breeder was able to tell it was a female ( i didn't want a male because at the time i had a male mourning dove who i was taking care of and released recently  and i knew a male would be aggressive towards him) 

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by broody rooster View Post

she thinks im her mate is the problem with that she coos at me flys to me and has um ..presented herself to me on numerous occasions so is there a way to get her to incubate eggs when i'm her mate or is there no point in trying this ? i dont know if theres a specific age id imagine shes not a whole year old yet as shes only laid eggs once before which is how the breeder was able to tell it was a female ( i didn't want a male because at the time i had a male mourning dove who i was taking care of and released recently  and i knew a male would be aggressive towards him) 

With doves the male brings nesting material for the hen to arrange as she wants. If you wish to try this, give the dove a bowl with some sand in the bottom, set her in the bowl and present her with a bit of straw/nesting material and see what she does with it. If she starts to arrange it into a nest give her more... and so forth. When she presents herself to you, rub her back. By doing so she will think she has mated, If things progress this far expect eggs in a week to 10 days. Normally doves take turns brooding the eggs, but I have had dove hens incubate on their own; at least mostly. Doves usually form pairs, but a male will pair with two hens at the same time, taking a turn on both nests.

If you get her a male, most likely she will file for divorce (from you) and mate with the male dove. Then nesting will proceed normally.
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by broody rooster View Post
 

hm that's strange they'd do that ...

 

The presence of eggs in the nest acts as a stimulus to continue brooding. If you remove the eggs, you break the brooding response. Introducing a baby after eggs have been removed for long enough time to have broken the brooding response will be seen as a nest-invasion by the parents. As smart as they are, parrots aren't able to make the connection that eggs which were once in their nest, then removed and incubated elsewhere, are the origin of these "nest invaders." From their perspective, no more eggs means "time to start a new clutch", and that sends them into "protective mode" for keeping their nest secure. If one wants to introduce hatched chicks into a nest for fostering, one would have to have a pair on eggs -- real or fake -- and then replace them with newly-hatched chicks and their egg shells. Even then, it's not guaranteed. I think part of the risk is that the chicks communicate with the parents before they hatch, and sometimes the parents don't recognize the calls of the chicks put in there for fostering.

:-)


Edited by Rosa moschata - 11/22/15 at 10:40am
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosa moschata View Post

The presence of eggs in the nest acts as a stimulus to continue brooding. If you remove the eggs, you break the brooding response. Introducing a baby after eggs have been removed for long enough time to have broken the brooding response will be seen as a nest-invasion by the parents. As smart as they are, parrots aren't able to make the connection that eggs which were once in their nest, then removed and incubated elsewhere, are the origin of these "nest invaders." From their perspective, no more eggs means "time to start a new clutch", and that sends them into "protective mode" for keeping their nest secure. If one wants to introduce hatched chicks into a nest for fostering, one would have to have a pair on eggs -- real or fake -- and then replace them with newly-hatched chicks and their egg shells. Even then, it's not guaranteed. I think part of the risk is that the chicks communicate with the parents before they hatch, and sometimes the parents don't recognize the calls of the chicks put in there for fostering.


:-)

X 2
post #38 of 39

i would love to try getting her a male but i don't have an extra cage if something goes wrong is the main hing holding me back 

post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by broody rooster View Post

i would love to try getting her a male but i don't have an extra cage if something goes wrong is the main hing holding me back 

Unfortunately there is no guarantee that the hen would accept a male.
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