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Salmon Faverolles Behaviour

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone.

 

After searching for a long, long while, I was finally able to find and purchase a pair of Faverolles. Since integrating them into my small flock, (Ameraucana and EEs), I've noticed a definite difference in (how do I put this nicely...) intelligence?

 

They are very, very docile and submissive, which I expected. The first few days out of quarantine were rough. The roo got into a skirmish with one of the EE hens and lost a bit of his comb. :(

They've worked everything out now, it seems, but the Favs still tend to keep to themselves while the other birds free range over the property together.

 

This is fine, but there are a few things that have me puzzled. This morning, for example, after letting everyone out of the coop for the day, the hen stayed in, and the roo went out.

I went back inside, and shortly I was hearing a terrible racket. Fearing we had a predator nearby or something terrible going on, I ran outside.

The roo and hen were calling in an absolute panic to each other because they couldn't see where the other was... except the roo was by the coop door, and the hen was on the other side. Literally inches away from one another.

I had to open the man-door and usher her out.

 

Two nights ago as I was 'tucking everyone in', I counted one missing hen. It was the Fav. I double checked and sure enough, she wasn't on the roosts, cuddled on/in the nest box, or on the benches. Before searching the entire property in the dark, on a whim I checked in the little space between the nest box and the wall... and there she was, sleeping wedged in there like a sardine. I have no idea how she expected to get back out in the morning, so I fished her out.

 

I guess what I'm asking those familiar with the breed is: are Favs just kind of... less bright than other breeds? Quirky? Or are my pair just extra special?

 

:idunno

post #2 of 8

I loved mine, but found them too timid to do well in my mixed flock.  I think your new hen is hiding because she's bottom of the pecking order and scared.  Bringing them into an established flock is harder too.  Things may work out in time, but you will need to watch out for her.  My last hen was a good broody mom, and died this summer at age eight.  Mary

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thank you for the insight. I'm hoping they'll integrate more with time. The squabbles have stopped, but I'll continue to keep an eye on her. smile.png
They're such sweet birds.
post #4 of 8

I keep my Faverolles separate from the egg laying flock. Partly because they are my breeder birds, and partly because they are too "soft" to keep with many of my free ranging breeds.

post #5 of 8

I just added Faverolles this year, and agree they're quite the "special" kind of bird.

 

I have an older hen that was gifted to me. She laid maybe a dozen eggs all summer. She's very bonded to humans and doesn't like to hang with the flock. She does now keep company with my young Faverolles cockerel Gabriel (cause he's fluffy :) ) and they roam around together, apart from the flock. The main rooster isn't interested in her at all, and Gabe isn't interested in anyone, although he's now 9 months old. He's kind of clumsy and trips over his own huge feet when he gets excited or nervous. He roosts on the regular roosts, but not near the other birds. She roosts on the edge of a nest box (Rubbermaid tote).

 

Then I hatched out 3 birds, two pullets and one cockerel. The little cock has me puzzled, he's the most aggressive chick I've ever seen. I've raised a lot of chicks and never had one this aggressive. he'll be butchered when he's old enough, mean doesn't get to breed around here.

One of the pullets is doing okay in the grow out pen---so far.

The other pullet was doing fine until a few days ago. I found her down in the pen. The other birds had trampled her, squished her wing into the bedding, she just looked a mess. Brought her inside, can't really find anything wrong except once she gets down, she can't seem to get up again. I'm guessing her wing got injured. Been keeping her in the house (just shoot me now, I have a chicken in the house) for warmth and extra feed cause she also feels much lighter than siblings. I put her back in the grow out pen yesterday for the day. She did alright, but when I checked on them after dark, she was down and apart from the others and couldn't get back up. So, she's spending her nights in the house. Let her out and just range today while I cleaned her tub. She walks fine, just slow, and was very good at hunting bugs and worms. No idea what's going on with her.

 

I'll probably re-evaluate their future in my flock in the summer. I'm getting into some bantam projects and just won't have the room for large fowl that need to be housed separate.

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by donrae View Post
 

 

Then I hatched out 3 birds, two pullets and one cockerel. The little cock has me puzzled, he's the most aggressive chick I've ever seen. I've raised a lot of chicks and never had one this aggressive. he'll be butchered when he's old enough, mean doesn't get to breed around here.

 

I have very rarely hatched an aggressive cockerel, but the small few I have encountered were MEAN. Nastiest cockerel award here is still held by a 9-10 month old Faverolles cockerel a few years back. He didn't bother with the sneak attack from the rear; he went with the full on frontal assault. Once he launched himself off the roosting perch at my face. He didn't last long, the idiot. Most of the males run away from me and could care less what I am doing even if it involves the hens.

post #7 of 8

That's what has surprised me about this guy. And it was from little, like 4 weeks old. He'd come at me to peck my hands when I was feeding, or messing with them. I know the "I'm a baby and don't know if you're good to eat" peck and the "Ohh, shiny, try to eat the ring" peck, but this was directed at flesh and hard and mean! I had to spend some time training this group not to rush the door, by pushing them back off the door jam with my foot. I pushed him off, he charged me. Only like 6 weeks old at the time. He charged me a good 4 times, never had a chick do that. I was reluctant to get harder with him, cause he was so little. Finally decided if he's not only this mean but stupid to boot, maybe he won't make 7 weeks and gave him a tumble. That seemed to straighten him out for a while, but he's still way too bold for my taste. Never had a bird this persistently aggressive this young. And such a contrast to my big oaf Gabe.

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #8 of 8

I had a hatchery bantam like that.  Full attack mode at seven to eight weeks of age!  Too small to eat, but culled.  Mary

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