BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures › Chickens blowing out their whole rear end ~warning pic
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Chickens blowing out their whole rear end ~warning pic

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

My husband and I have had chickens nearly our whole lives and have never really had any significant issues.  This spring we ordered a new bath of chicks and they have just started laying in the last 4 weeks.  Over the last week we have found more than one that is dead and appears to have blown out their entire rear end.  Various breeds..this one is a leghorn, but we have lost two Americaunas and one Red Star the same way.

We check all of our chickens daily and there is nothing we can see that seems to be "off" until we find them dead..they appear to just blow out and drop dead in a single moment...while eating or even from a roost.

This chicken has what I think is yolk, around where the vent would have been.  Although the others were so covered in blood that we couldn't see anything. (This chicken was dead at least 3 hours before we found it, the others were still "fresh" when we found them)  I can't seem to capture it in photos, but I can see at least 2 separate yolks down inside of this chicken.  We didn't examine the others as closely, because we just thought it was a fluke.  Now we clearly have a pattern.

Help!  We have no idea what this is or what to do about it


Edited by goatstafson - 11/19/15 at 8:21pm
post #2 of 8

That is bizarre. Never heard of anything like that. By looking at the picture the first thing that comes to my mind is that a possum got it since they like to start eating from that end of the chicken.

 

Otherwise :idunno

You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

Chicken Injuries & Diseases

Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

Reply

You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

Chicken Injuries & Diseases

Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

Reply
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

No possum..we don't even have them up here.  I know that this is not a predator issue...our chicken house is pretty tight and our dogs are in a pen around it.  There is no way a predator is going past our two big dogs.

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

Oh and I should mention that on the other chickens it was clear from the blood pattern that whatever happened was internal...it honestly looked like a small bomb blew them up from the inside.

post #5 of 8

goatstafson I am so sorry to read of your loss :(

 

That is bizarre! I have not seen or heard of anything like it.

 

If it was just the one hen, I would lean towards a prolapsed vent kind of thing that the others may have pecked off or maybe even a lodged egg that had exploded, not that I have heard of that either; but more than one hen in a short period of time, doubtful at best.

 

At a stretch, I am wondering if it is not some sort of internal parasite?  But you would think there would be others signs of illness.

Something wrong in the feed, causing a build up of gas?

 

To be honest, I am grabbing at straws here but definitely subscribing because I would like to know what others think.

 

Edited to add: ?? Poisoning of some sort.  Any chance they have managed to get into some mouse or rat baits?  Something caustic they are drinking?


Edited by Teila - 11/19/15 at 9:24pm

Bambrook Bantams; Home to Cilla, Dusty, LuLu, Blondie and Crystal

 

'There is No snooze button on a chicken who wants breakfast'

 

'Until One Has Loved An Animal, Part Of Their Soul Remains Unawakened'

 

My Chicken Page: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bambrook-bantams

 

Teila's Tales from the Coop: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1109051/teilas-tales-from-the-coop

Reply

Bambrook Bantams; Home to Cilla, Dusty, LuLu, Blondie and Crystal

 

'There is No snooze button on a chicken who wants breakfast'

 

'Until One Has Loved An Animal, Part Of Their Soul Remains Unawakened'

 

My Chicken Page: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bambrook-bantams

 

Teila's Tales from the Coop: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1109051/teilas-tales-from-the-coop

Reply
post #6 of 8


I would definitely have a necropsy done.  It is very strange.  So sorry for your loss...

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

We have wormed them with Wazine and treated with Ivermectin..and gave them a good Seven dust.  We did that after the first 2 deaths, before then last 2...3 weeks separated those deaths.

I have been doing daily checks for signs of egg binding.  I had one that I suspected and did the whole bath thing...she laid that egg almost as soon as I got her into the water so I think I just jumped the gun in my worry and she wasn't really egg bound

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by goatstafson View Post
 

We have wormed them with Wazine and treated with Ivermectin..and gave them a good Seven dust.  We did that after the first 2 deaths, before then last 2...3 weeks separated those deaths.

I have been doing daily checks for signs of egg binding.  I had one that I suspected and did the whole bath thing...she laid that egg almost as soon as I got her into the water so I think I just jumped the gun in my worry and she wasn't really egg bound


Wazine only treats roundworms. Ivermectin is for treating parasites (lice, mites, and some internal infections caused from parasites) and is not an effective wormer. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2816174

 

You may want to go with a better wormer such as Valbazen or Safeguard that contains (fenbendazol). They will treat most worms but not tapeworms. Just because you don't see worms in the poop does not necessarily mean they don't have them. Many worms are so small (such as hair worms) that you cannot see.

 

Another possibility could be Flukes. Read about it here:

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/poultry/miscellaneous_conditions_of_poultry/fluke_infections_in_poultry.html

 

"Light infections without signs appear in ducks and other birds with a functional bursa. In gallinaceous birds, heavy infections in the oviduct cause inappetence, droopiness, weight loss, calcareous cloacal discharge, depressed egg production, and an increase in soft-shelled eggs. Lesions range from mild inflammation to distention or rupture of the oviduct; death may result. Diagnosis by fecal examination is unreliable, because fluke eggs are not consistently present. Adult flukes may appear in the bird's eggs or be found in the oviduct on necropsy."

 

There is no licensed treatment for flukes in poultry so I don't know what could be tried. I'm not saying this is the problem. Only a necropsy can tell for certain. Just putting the information out there for you to check into.

You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

Chicken Injuries & Diseases

Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

Reply

You win some and lose some. When at first you don't succeed: try... try... try... try and try again.

 

How to Provide Emergency and Supportive Care        

Maintaining a Healthy Flock

Chicken Injuries & Diseases

Poop Chart 

Emergency Helpful References & Links

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures › Chickens blowing out their whole rear end ~warning pic