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Young hens dying relatively suddenly...5 in the last 4 days

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

HELP! My DH and I are new to the backyard chicken keeping and everything has been going wonderful up until 4 days ago when we lost our first bird with little warning. 

As of today, we have lost a total of 4 ( and one that isn't doing so well) ten week old hens and 1 fourteen week old hen. I have cleaned out the coop, changed out all water and food and cleaned the containers. I'm at a loss. 

All I have noticed is that shortly before they die, they become weak and their wings are droopy and they sleep a lot. :(

 

Any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated!!

post #2 of 6

I always treat for cocci overgrowth if birds start acting lethargic and off.  Get a round of Sulmet, or preferably Corid into them.  Cocci is almost always the problem in young birds that start dropping.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

I looked up the Corid at Tractor Supply and it gives directions for calves. How would I do this for my young hens? I will head out today to get some. 

I'm worried about my birds. :(

post #4 of 6

These dosages were posted by Casportpony in a past post:

 

"The 9.6% Corid liquid dose I use is 10ml (2 teaspoons) per gallon for 5 days, then 2.5ml (1/2 teaspoon) per gallon for 7 days. Make fresh daily.

 

The 20% Corid powder dose I use is 1.5 teaspoons per gallon for 5 days, then 1/2 teaspoon for 7 days. Make fresh daily.

 

Medicated water must be their only source of water (no creeks, puddles ponds, etc.)"

 

Don't delay treatment, start as soon as possible.  You can also make a drench with the corid to give to an individual bird if it's very sick.

If you have liquid corid, just use a drop or two straight.  For the powder you mix 1/2 tsp of powder in 10 ml of water.  Dose the bird 0.07 ml of that mixture per 100 grams of weight of the bird, once a day for up to three days.  The drench is used in addition to the treatment above, if neccessary. 

 

Good luck, hope your birds get better!

Also, if you have cocci in your soil, this can be a recurring problem.  Good idea to keep Corid on hand.  New birds will be susceptible, and I sometimes have an outbreak after rainy periods where the ground stays wet.  Chicks are more susceptible than older birds, but can happen to any.  Corid is very safe to use, and I don't hesitate if I a bird shows signs. 

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by coach723 View Post

Also, if you have cocci in your soil, this can be a recurring problem.  Good idea to keep Corid on hand.  New birds will be susceptible, and I sometimes have an outbreak after rainy periods where the ground stays wet.  Chicks are more susceptible than older birds, but can happen to any.  Corid is very safe to use, and I don't hesitate if I a bird shows signs. 

Rainy weather does seem to trigger a spike in cocci numbers.  My first outbreak was in 2 y.o. birds after a period of particularly wet weather.  I opened the coop one morning and thought a murder had taken place.  Bloody poops everywhere.  Classic cocci.

post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by coach723 View Post
 

These dosages were posted by Casportpony in a past post:

 

"The 9.6% Corid liquid dose I use is 10ml (2 teaspoons) per gallon for 5 days, then 2.5ml (1/2 teaspoon) per gallon for 7 days. Make fresh daily.

 

The 20% Corid powder dose I use is 1.5 teaspoons per gallon for 5 days, then 1/2 teaspoon for 7 days. Make fresh daily.

 

Medicated water must be their only source of water (no creeks, puddles ponds, etc.)"

 

Don't delay treatment, start as soon as possible.  You can also make a drench with the corid to give to an individual bird if it's very sick.

If you have liquid corid, just use a drop or two straight.  For the powder you mix 1/2 tsp of powder in 10 ml of water.  Dose the bird 0.07 ml of that mixture per 100 grams of weight of the bird, once a day for up to three days.  The drench is used in addition to the treatment above, if neccessary. 

 

Good luck, hope your birds get better!

Also, if you have cocci in your soil, this can be a recurring problem.  Good idea to keep Corid on hand.  New birds will be susceptible, and I sometimes have an outbreak after rainy periods where the ground stays wet.  Chicks are more susceptible than older birds, but can happen to any.  Corid is very safe to use, and I don't hesitate if I a bird shows signs. 

X2!

 

-Kathy

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