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Worming Studies and References

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Syngamus trachea  (Gapeworm)

 

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6750887

Efficacy of fenbendazole against helminth parasites of poultry in Uganda.

Abstract

Fenbendazole 4% (Panacur, Hoechst) administered in feed was used to treat chickens infected with Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Railletina spp. It was also used to treat Syngamus trachea in broiler birds. There was a marked drop in helminth egg counts in the faeces on the second day of treatment and the faeces became negative by the seventh day after the last treatment. Post-mortem examination 15 to 21 days later showed that the drug was 100% effective against Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum at 10 mg/kg. However, for complete removal of Railletina spp. 15 mg/kg was required. Similarly 20 mg/kg fenbendazole was effective against Syngamus trachea. It was concluded that fenbendazole is suitable for the treatment of the important intestinal and tracheal worms of poultry, a dose of 15 to 20 mg/kg for 3 consecutive days being recommended for use under field conditions.

 

 


 

 

Source: http://eurekamag.com/research/007/133/007133599.php

Comparative anthelmintic efficacy of mebendazole thiabendazole and albendazole against syngamus trachea infection in chicken

Devada K.; Sathianesan V., 1989: Comparative anthelmintic efficacy of mebendazole thiabendazole and albendazole against syngamus trachea infection in chicken. Kerala Journal Of Veterinary Science. 20(1): 59-64

Three anthelmintics viz., mebendazole, (Gulfic) thiabendazole (MSD) and albendazole (SKF) were tried against Syngamus trachea infection in chicken under experimental conditions. Mebendazole dosed at a rate of 40 mg per kg body weight was found to be most effective with 96.22 per cent reduction of eggs in the droppings, 88.1 per cent of disappearance of worms in the trachea and 95.52 per cent of weight gain of the treated birds. This was closely followed by albendazole administered at 15 mg per kg body weight, which had an efficacy of 95.14 per cent 76.19 per cent and 95.02 per cent in the respective three parameters. Thiabendazole given at a dose rate of 500 mg per kg body weight showed an efficacy of 89.27, 45.24 per cent and 94.18 perccent based on the egg counts, worm counts and gain in body weight of the medicated chicks respectively. Thiabendazole was found to be the least effective when compared to the other drugs tried.

 

 


 

Source: http://eurekamag.com/research/003/122/003122652.php

Efficacy of albendazole against Syngamus trachea in experimentally infected turkeys

Istvan, Varga; Gyorgy, Banhidi; Zoltan, Szell; Csaba, Balint, 1998: Efficacy of albendazole against Syngamus trachea in experimentally infected turkeys.Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja. 120(6): 336-338, E

Efficacy of albendazole of Syngamus trachea tested in groups of 8 to 9 turkeys experimentally infected with 500 larvae each at the age of 8 days. From day 17 after infection, the animals were orally dosed with albendazole at 10, 5 or 2 mg/kg b.w. over 3 to 5 successive days. The efficacy was evaluated by daily inspection of symptoms, daily faecal egg counts and worm counts at post mortem on day 24 after infection. The efficacy in the treated groups amounted to 100%, 100% and 94%, respectively. Remnants of wormpairs - mainly disintegrating males - were found in several animals of medicated groups as against all alive wormpairs in the control turkeys. The study shows high efficacy of albendazole at reduced dose rate against patent gapeworm disease in turkey.

 


 

Source:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9269125

Anthelmintic efficacy of ivermectin against Syngamus trachea and Capillaria spp. in pheasant.

Abstract

Ivermectin (IVM) was perorally administered in dosage schemes 1 x 0.8 mg/kg of body weight (b.w.), 1 x 1.6 mg/kg h.w., 3 x 0.8 mg/kg b.w., and 3 x 1.6 mg/kg b.w. to pheasants infected by Syngamus trachea and Capillaria spp. The samples of faeces were coprologically examined. The clinical state of pheasant was controlled. In all of the used therapeutical schemes the helminthostatic or partially helminthocide effect against adults of worms was reached. The clinical signs of helmithoses were reduced only. IVM in tested doses is not possible to recommend as an effective drug of pheasant syngamosis and capillariosis.


Edited by casportpony - 11/23/15 at 11:50am
post #2 of 6
Very interesting. Thanks for posting this.
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/6868306/?i=5&from=/6743169/related

Efficacy of fenbendazole against nematodes of captive birds.

Lawrence K. Vet Rec. 1983.

Abstract

Fenbendazole was used to treat nematode infestations (Ascaridia species and Capillaria species) in 230 birds of six orders and 38 different species. Using a single dose of 100 mg/kg bodyweight initial treatment eliminated parasitic nematodes from 221 birds. A further course of treatment at a dose rate of 30 mg/kg daily for seven days eliminated the infestation from the remaining nine birds.

 

-Kathy

post #4 of 6

Also note the date of that study;  1983.  Good information, but dated.  It's a difficult trade-off between trying to use the very few approved drugs, and finding something that's effective, but not likely to linger in the bird.  Effectiveness also depends on previous use (or overuse) in a specific location.  Nothing trumps good husbandry, genetics, and biosecurity.  Mary

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post

Also note the date of that study;  1983.  Good information, but dated.  It's a difficult trade-off between trying to use the very few approved drugs, and finding something that's effective, but not likely to linger in the bird.  Effectiveness also depends on previous use (or overuse) in a specific location.  Nothing trumps good husbandry, genetics, and biosecurity.  Mary

I've also seen other references to treating capillary worms with one large dose of fenbendazole. Not saying people should try it, just want to share info that I've found. Sadly, many people think that a single dose at 5mg/kg (1/2 cc Safeguard for an averaged sized hen) will treat capillary worms. And the one that bugs me the most is the "3 cc (300 mg) in one gallon for three days". he.gif

-Kathy
Edited by casportpony - 11/25/15 at 9:46am
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Zentralbl Veterinarmed B. 1989 Sep;36(7):495-9.

Ivermectin as a bird anthelmintic--trials with naturally infected domestic fowl.

Abstract

To evaluate the use of ivermectin as a bird anthelmintic, 29 White Leghorn hens naturally infected with Ascaridia spp., Heterakis spp. and Capillaria spp. were treated with 0.2, 2 or 6 mg/kg intramuscularly or 0.2 or 0.8 mg/kg orally. Faecal samples were collected before treatment and at autopsy, 2, 6, or 16 days after treatment, when the intestines were also examined for helminths. None of the treatments gave satisfactory anthelmintic results.

 

 

-Kathy

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