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My little ladies started eating there eggs this morning. - Page 2

post #11 of 15
You can save money and use the egg shells instead of buying oyster shell. Crush the shells up then bake them for a little while in the oven (makes them more brittle), then crush them further into tiny little pieces. My chickens have nice, thick shells from doing this (in addition to feeding them cracked open, whole, raw eggs). And it won't look like eggshells, for those convinced feeding whole shells will cause egg eaters.
My animals were stolen by a family member and rehomed without my knowledge or consent. I was away for the weekend and they were supposed to be caring for them for me. I have no idea where any of them are at this point.

RIP Fat Cat: 1999 - 3/21/2015
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My animals were stolen by a family member and rehomed without my knowledge or consent. I was away for the weekend and they were supposed to be caring for them for me. I have no idea where any of them are at this point.

RIP Fat Cat: 1999 - 3/21/2015
Reply
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anira View Post

You can save money and use the egg shells instead of buying oyster shell. Crush the shells up then bake them for a little while in the oven (makes them more brittle), then crush them further into tiny little pieces. My chickens have nice, thick shells from doing this (in addition to feeding them cracked open, whole, raw eggs). And it won't look like eggshells, for those convinced feeding whole shells will cause egg eaters.

Egg shells can help with calcium, but it really moves thru the system to fast to be absorbed well enough to be the only calcium source...oyster shell is a much better choice and you can mix the crushed egg shells to mix with the oyster shell. 

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anira View Post

You can save money and use the egg shells instead of buying oyster shell. Crush the shells up then bake them for a little while in the oven (makes them more brittle), then crush them further into tiny little pieces. My chickens have nice, thick shells from doing this (in addition to feeding them cracked open, whole, raw eggs). And it won't look like eggshells, for those convinced feeding whole shells will cause egg eaters.

Egg shells can help with calcium, but it really moves thru the system to fast to be absorbed well enough to be the only calcium source...oyster shell is a much better choice and you can mix the crushed egg shells to mix with the oyster shell. 

I've never used oyster shell and have nice thick shells on all of my eggs. My turkey eggs you nearly need a hammer to open (exaggerated, of course), and that doesn't even include the thick membranes.

My animals were stolen by a family member and rehomed without my knowledge or consent. I was away for the weekend and they were supposed to be caring for them for me. I have no idea where any of them are at this point.

RIP Fat Cat: 1999 - 3/21/2015
Reply
My animals were stolen by a family member and rehomed without my knowledge or consent. I was away for the weekend and they were supposed to be caring for them for me. I have no idea where any of them are at this point.

RIP Fat Cat: 1999 - 3/21/2015
Reply
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anira View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anira View Post

You can save money and use the egg shells instead of buying oyster shell. Crush the shells up then bake them for a little while in the oven (makes them more brittle), then crush them further into tiny little pieces. My chickens have nice, thick shells from doing this (in addition to feeding them cracked open, whole, raw eggs). And it won't look like eggshells, for those convinced feeding whole shells will cause egg eaters.

Egg shells can help with calcium, but it really moves thru the system to fast to be absorbed well enough to be the only calcium source...oyster shell is a much better choice and you can mix the crushed egg shells to mix with the oyster shell. 

I've never used oyster shell and have nice thick shells on all of my eggs. My turkey eggs you nearly need a hammer to open (exaggerated, of course), and that doesn't even include the thick membranes.

Are you feeding layer feed? Do they free range?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #15 of 15

Oyster shell around here is only about $7.00 for a fifty pound sack. I don't know how much it is in your areas, but I think it's a worthwhile investment to keep the hens healthy.

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