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Was this egg fertilized and already starting to develop?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I am very much a newby and we just started getting eggs two weeks ago tomorrow. I've seen pics of the bullseye on the yolks searching here, but what I have seems past that point, or not that at all!

This egg was quite larger and weighed 67grams as opposed to the 40-47 grams my other eggs from my pullets are laying, so I was not surprised it was a double yolker. The egg smelled fine and beat normally and has since gone into a loaf of bread, but I'm just wondering about the two 'tissue'-like masses. Each yolk had one. I'm not concerned per se, just curious.


Thank you in advance to anyone contributing to my continued education on all things chicken and duck! ūüėČ
post #2 of 6
Some hens will lay eggs with gunk inside, it's usually a bit of the oviduct lining, unfortunately some hens do it for every egg. Large producers candle their eggs and remove such eggs from the line and sell them for other things like powdered eggs, so most people aren't familiar with the stuff that can show up in eggs. Developing eggs form blood vessels first, yours just has gunk, I use a spoon to remove such stuff, and I always break my eggs in a separate bowl first to make sure there's nothing in them.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thank you for responding. That's exactly what I did; I fished it out with a spoon, and then went on about my bread making business. ‚ėļ
post #4 of 6
Happy to hear you went on with baking, some can get put off by such stuff.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #5 of 6

Usually a piece of tissue, or spot of blood from a broken vessel, breaks off when ovum releases from ovary.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Usually a piece of tissue, or spot of blood from a broken vessel, breaks off when ovum releases from ovary.


x2  They are called meat spots.

Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

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Breeding Welsummers and Barnevelders.

 

Having an Icelandic in the coop is like having a 2 year old in the house - they are into everything and don't follow the rules.



Join us for the 7th Annual Easter Hatchalong!
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1074649/the-7th-annual-byc-easter-hatch-a-long/0_50

Reply
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