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Trying to save a chicken with a prolapse

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

For four days now - my 8 month old laying silkie has a recurrent prolapse.  Day one was Sunday, so I tried everything I have read here at BYC and while the prolapse would go back in, in less than a minute it would be out again.

 

Day two, she went to my vet, who is just starting out her expansion into chicken medicine - we are her first patient.  She did everything I did, then did a complete purse string suture - and then took it out because "Jennifer Aniston" is a layer.  Late in the day,

per the advice on BYC, I told her we should be able to do that to her temporarily as long as she (the vet) did not feel it was due to egg binding but that we had to induce her molt. 

 

Day three, the vet called a chicken vet, confirmed what I had to say - performed an xray, that shows there are two eggs.  She did a partial purse string, but Jennifer was able to prolapse through that.  I asked my vet to check with the expert to find out how long an egg sits in the tract. 

 

My question to you chicken experts - do you think we can induce Jennifer into a molt, purse string her, make her broody (I've got some small plastic eggs) - and keep that suture there for a month, or less if Jennifer shows signs of distress and then remove it?  I don't how long these eggs can sit in her without trying to pass and make her sick.  (Currently she is not sick/no distress)

 

The removing the vent (or female part that creates the eggs) is not an option, since this is my vets first experience with this.  I would have pursued that option first - but the vet is struggling as it is.

 

I don't care if she prolapse again - I would get her to the appropriate doctor to remove her female part, this just happened at a bad time, and I had no prior knowledge of who works on chickens in my area.  For me, a pet chicken is better than a dead chicken - but at the same time - I'm not going to let her suffer.

 

I need some expert advice here - and I know you guys have it.  I also spoke to the vet about getting antibodics on board, along with some liquid calcium - which she has to ask the chicken vet about - she said she had no idea that we needed to do that.  If you already know what type of antibodic Jennifer needs and the dosage - that would be awesome information.  I'm glad my vet took this on - but I think we are both realizing that she wasn't equipped to get the worse case scenario as a first patient.  I put Jennifer in the dark all day Sunday, but I'm sure when she went to the vet, they didn't know to do this, however Doc put her in the dark as of yesterday.  We have not determined why she prolapsed, and probably won't - she is able to poop, and initially strained most of Sunday, but since then that isn't as bad.  Vet just stopped her feedings yesterday, keeping her hydrated though - as again the vet just wasn't aware of what needed to be done.

 

This is day four - I won't know what the vet did till the end of the day (we are US East Coast time).  I spent $12 to buy Jennifer, now I will probably spend a couple hundred to save her (or not).  I don't want to give up, so I hope a few of you experts and get us in the correct path!

 

Thank you

post #2 of 9

If there are any eggs in the oviduct or uterus, they will want to come out. You CAN however gently break them as they near the vent so as to prevent her from getting prolapse again. When the egg gets near the vent and you see it, you can make a tiny hole in the egg and suck out the contents with an empty syringe. GENTLY colapse the egg with your finger and GENTLY pull it all out in one swoop.

 

BUT...you can get them to stop laying by keeping them in semi darkness for 8 hours a day and the rest of the day complete darkness. Semi, by low light. This very short day should shut off her egg laying machine and send her into a molt. This should give her enough time to heal over the next couple of months.

 

The number one cause of egg binding in a laying hen, (brand new pullets have other reasons for egg binding) is dehydration. So always make sure there are plenty of waterers for all your birds. Lowest in the order birds can be chased way from food and water on a regular basis. 

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

My wonderful vet called me this morning from home - as it was her scheduled day off today.

 

Her discussions with the chicken expert were grim, first because the Jennifer would need surgery to remove the eggs (they were not in the pelvis, but high up - probably at the point were eggs just start to get hard - manual manipulation was not going to get them out) and second, because my vet would be off the next two days.  To do surgery, it would have to wait two days - making it almost six days since she first prolapsed.  It would be my vets first time trying to do this surgery - so it would almost prove to be an experiment.

 

Jennifer had already had a few attempts (four to be exact) to suture in the prolapse without doing a complete purse string.  Her tissue was being torn each time she would re-prolapse after the procedure.

 

We both felt that we would not be doing right by Jennifer if we continued to "try" to help her - and the best thing would be to humanely euthanize her before she became obviously in pain and sick from her condition.  Being that we are both new to this - and Jennifer probably had the worst case scenario prolapse for us as beginners - we didn't want to make her into a pin cushion.  Had we known on day one that what we needed to do was surgery after all the non-invasive suggestions failed - we definitely would have gone that route.  It's a learning experience for both of us, which I personally hope that I don't have to go through it again.

 

All the advice from previous posts on here regarding prolapse were excellent in nature. All I have to add is if another beginner reads my post  after the others on prolapse vents - if your plans are to save your chicken no matter what - if the prolapse isn't corrected within 24 hours of what everyone on the forum recommends, go to the vet, get an xray, and do surgery right away if there are eggs involved that do not reside in the pelvis.  If one attempt is made to repair the prolapse but it re-prolapses, precious time is burnt up by not just going ahead and doing a complete purse string.  Jennifer may have had a chance - but it just wasn't meant to be and I just couldn't bear the thought of causing her anymore stress and possible pain.  She was a sweet little hen and unfortunately I just didn't get it right.

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktpaco View Post

My wonderful vet called me this morning from home - as it was her scheduled day off today.

Her discussions with the chicken expert were grim, first because the Jennifer would need surgery to remove the eggs (they were not in the pelvis, but high up - probably at the point were eggs just start to get hard - manual manipulation was not going to get them out) and second, because my vet would be off the next two days.  To do surgery, it would have to wait two days - making it almost six days since she first prolapsed.  It would be my vets first time trying to do this surgery - so it would almost prove to be an experiment.

Jennifer had already had a few attempts (four to be exact) to suture in the prolapse without doing a complete purse string.  Her tissue was being torn each time she would re-prolapse after the procedure.

We both felt that we would not be doing right by Jennifer if we continued to "try" to help her - and the best thing would be to humanely euthanize her before she became obviously in pain and sick from her condition.  Being that we are both new to this - and Jennifer probably had the worst case scenario prolapse for us as beginners - we didn't want to make her into a pin cushion.  Had we known on day one that what we needed to do was surgery after all the non-invasive suggestions failed - we definitely would have gone that route.  It's a learning experience for both of us, which I personally hope that I don't have to go through it again.

All the advice from previous posts on here regarding prolapse were excellent in nature. All I have to add is if another beginner reads my post  after the others on prolapse vents - if your plans are to save your chicken no matter what - if the prolapse isn't corrected within 24 hours of what everyone on the forum recommends, go to the vet, get an xray, and do surgery right away if there are eggs involved that do not reside in the pelvis.  If one attempt is made to repair the prolapse but it re-prolapses, precious time is burnt up by not just going ahead and doing a complete purse string.  Jennifer may have had a chance - but it just wasn't meant to be and I just couldn't bear the thought of causing her anymore stress and possible pain.  She was a sweet little hen and unfortunately I just didn't get it right.

I am so so sorry. hugs.gif. I think you did the right thing in putting her down. I DO hope your heavy heart can heal soon. hugs.gif

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

TwoCrows -

 

Thank you for your responses - I really do appreciate the fact that you took time to give me your thoughts.  I do have a heavy heart, along with a lot of guilt. 

 

I hope I don't have to go through this again - being a relatively new chicken owner, and an animal lover in general, this was really a downer. 

 

I need to get on the introductions thread - as this really wasn't the way I wanted to get to know others - but at the moment I just can't get myself to do it.

 

Hope you have a happy Thanksgiving.  Kelli

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktpaco View Post
 

TwoCrows -

 

Thank you for your responses - I really do appreciate the fact that you took time to give me your thoughts.  I do have a heavy heart, along with a lot of guilt. 

 

I hope I don't have to go through this again - being a relatively new chicken owner, and an animal lover in general, this was really a downer. 

 

I need to get on the introductions thread - as this really wasn't the way I wanted to get to know others - but at the moment I just can't get myself to do it.

 

Hope you have a happy Thanksgiving.  Kelli

Oh, don't feel guilty! You did all you could for her and it was not your fault! I know how hard it is to lose one of your birds. It is not easy, even when it happens as an old chicken keeper. These birds work their way into your heart and when they pass, it leaves a big empty. I know this was very hard for you right now, but the rest of your flock needs you to be strong. These things happen and you can feel good in knowing you not only did the right thing but she is no longer suffering and she is in the arms of her Creator. 

 

Lots of people sign on to BYC with emergencies before introducing themselves. You don't have to do an introduction here on BYC. Do it when you feel ready. 

 

Many hugs and blessings to you and again, I am truly sorry. :hugs 

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply
post #7 of 9

I saw your post this morning just before I had to leave. I've been thinking of you all day and I'm so sorry to hear about her. :hugs 

 

You were very selfless and kind to save her from suffering; she was a very fortunate hen to have you as her owner. You did your very best...and in the end that's all we can do. :hugs

150+ chickens: Ameraucana, Icelandic, EE, OE, Crele & Silver Duckwing OEGB, Silkies, Barred Rock, 1 Button Quail
A bunch 'o guinea fowl.
19 rabbits, 3 dogs, 8 cats, 2 budgies, 2 llamas, Katahdin sheep, cattle and a leopard Appaloosa.

"Live so that when your children think of fairness and integrity, they think of you."
- Jackson Brown
Reply
150+ chickens: Ameraucana, Icelandic, EE, OE, Crele & Silver Duckwing OEGB, Silkies, Barred Rock, 1 Button Quail
A bunch 'o guinea fowl.
19 rabbits, 3 dogs, 8 cats, 2 budgies, 2 llamas, Katahdin sheep, cattle and a leopard Appaloosa.

"Live so that when your children think of fairness and integrity, they think of you."
- Jackson Brown
Reply
post #8 of 9
Sorry you lost her.
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wickedchicken6 View Post

I saw your post this morning just before I had to leave. I've been thinking of you all day and I'm so sorry to hear about her. hugs.gif  

You were very selfless and kind to save her from suffering; she was a very fortunate hen to have you as her owner. You did your very best...and in the end that's all we can do. hugs.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hholly View Post

Sorry you lost her.

Thank you both - my SO was very sweet, buried her in our woods and put up a little cross. My vet office actually got her footprint on one if those "memorial" plaster/clay pieces that they give you when a pet has to be put down, so once it cures, I'll probably hang it on her little gravesite.
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