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Identifying sets in a flock born over many settings - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by NTBugtraq View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

That should work, did you see my tutorial?

Will pm the file.

 

I did read your tutorial, thanks for that. My concern is strangling a leg, and having to check so many birds (over 300) to see if the bands are constricting. I thought the bandettes would give more, and therefore be less likely to cause a serious problem.

 

I suck at catching my birds, too many roosts in the way I think. I am awaiting the arrival of a relatively cheap snake catcher, which should help me grab the bird I want. I tried the coat hanger shepherds hook, and my coat hangers are too thin to work. So, with this snake catcher, I hope to be able to check any bird I want at any time. That puts my mind to rest about using zip ties, which are clearly the least expensive choice.

 

Now I have a slightly different problem. I have 5 different settings of pullets in my main flock that I need to tag. The youngest are 12 weeks, the oldest are 28 weeks. I would like to cull them in order next year. So my plan is to weigh them all and hopefully I'll find that the oldest birds are also the heaviest. Sound like a plan to you?

 

BTW, I don't need to know one bird from a set from any other bird in the set...just the setting is enough.

I have no idea how to manage leg bands on that many birds.

Leg strangling is definitely a risk with zipties, not sure about other bands, the end cutter thru the ziplock is the way to get them off easily tho.

With practice I found to leave it loose enough to stay on foot, but plenty of room for leg to grow, by 12 weeks you shouldn't have to change it again.

 

Luckily my roosts are easily accessible and I grab the bird off the roost at night with both hands holding the wings against the body, football carry it out to my chair, then roll it over onto it's back on my lap.

 

You might think about using many pens and keeping sets confined together.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #12 of 16

I use spiral leg bands from Cutlers Supply (great source, they have all sorts of bands and are the cheapest I've found so far). I think they have a bit more give than zip ties, but I have still had a few cause "girdling" problems when I wasn't paying attention to the growth of their legs. I think bandettes might have the same issue if you leave the small size on too long.

 

Honestly, I don't worry about the different ages across a years hatches. When culling hens, I'd more go by whether they are currently laying or not, by checking the distance between their pubic bones. When culling from my laying flock, I move the ones I suspect have quite laying to a separate pen for a week or so, and if no eggs show up, I know I'm right and they get sold or free-ranged on the farm (my version of literally putting them out to pasture).

Raising lots of fun poultry: Cream Legbars, Welbars, Bielefelders, California Greys, and 6 colors / sizes of Ameraucanas

Also Turkeys, Guineas and Peafowl

 

I have eggs and chicks available for sale from some of these breeds, details at my website

How to make a hoop tractor

My Poultry Blog

Reply

Raising lots of fun poultry: Cream Legbars, Welbars, Bielefelders, California Greys, and 6 colors / sizes of Ameraucanas

Also Turkeys, Guineas and Peafowl

 

I have eggs and chicks available for sale from some of these breeds, details at my website

How to make a hoop tractor

My Poultry Blog

Reply
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dheltzel View Post

 

Honestly, I don't worry about the different ages across a years hatches. When culling hens, I'd more go by whether they are currently laying or not, by checking the distance between their pubic bones.

The pubic bone thing works if your concern is whether they're 'spent' but it doesn't seem like he's looking for that - he's looking at culling year old birds - so I'd guess he's trying to move forward with a breed specification.

 

 

I don't worry about multiple hatches across a year - what's important is who the parents are - and generally my hatches across a breeding season are all from the same breeding groups - they're all genetically equivalent. I do try to make sure that different generations are marked differently.

I'm currently using zip ties, but I don't put them on until the birds are almost fully grown. I'm planning on going to wing bands next year.

post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyTalk View Post
 

The pubic bone thing works if your concern is whether they're 'spent' but it doesn't seem like he's looking for that - he's looking at culling year old birds - so I'd guess he's trying to move forward with a breed specification.

 

I don't worry about multiple hatches across a year - what's important is who the parents are - and generally my hatches across a breeding season are all from the same breeding groups - they're all genetically equivalent. I do try to make sure that different generations are marked differently.

I'm currently using zip ties, but I don't put them on until the birds are almost fully grown. I'm planning on going to wing bands next year.

 

Yes, I am doing some inbreeding...7 sets this year made Gen1 layers, 5 sets starting Jan. 6 makes Gen2 layers, 3 further sets make Gen3 layers. That takes me to November next year, and has me with some 400 birds at that time. There's a lot of juggling going on during that time in order to keep the right birds moving from brooder to juvenile pen to sales/processing or main pen at the right time.

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by NTBugtraq View Post
 

 

Yes, I am doing some inbreeding...7 sets this year made Gen1 layers, 5 sets starting Jan. 6 makes Gen2 layers, 3 further sets make Gen3 layers. That takes me to November next year, and has me with some 400 birds at that time. There's a lot of juggling going on during that time in order to keep the right birds moving from brooder to juvenile pen to sales/processing or main pen at the right time.

 

Ok, so you're trying to compress the timescale of each generation as much as possible - makes sense - and you've got smaller gaps. My last birds are usually born in August or September, and first are born Feb/March - so there's plenty of differentiation between them, and plenty of time to tag the older ones before I start evaluating. You're not going to have that - your June birds may be a different generation than your July birds. Correct?

 

 

That definitely makes it more complicated. Do you have multiple pens, or are you ranging/mixing/etc? It would certainly make the process easier if you didn't have to tag birds until they were atleast a couple months old - that would eliminate a lot of the band swapping - you could probably fit them with adult bands at 16 weeks or so.

post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyTalk View Post

 

Ok, so you're trying to compress the timescale of each generation as much as possible - makes sense - and you've got smaller gaps. My last birds are usually born in August or September, and first are born Feb/March - so there's plenty of differentiation between them, and plenty of time to tag the older ones before I start evaluating. You're not going to have that - your June birds may be a different generation than your July birds. Correct?

 

That definitely makes it more complicated. Do you have multiple pens, or are you ranging/mixing/etc? It would certainly make the process easier if you didn't have to tag birds until they were atleast a couple months old - that would eliminate a lot of the band swapping - you could probably fit them with adult bands at 16 weeks or so.

 

My Gen1 layers are already laying. Gen2 layers will start laying towards the end of June, at which point the last of the Gen1 layers will be culled. Gen3 layers start laying near the middle of December, so Gen2 get culled. Laying pullets are being culled at ~31 weeks.

 

I have;

 

  • indoor brooders for up to 4 weeks
  • a juvenile pen up to 12 weeks (pullets) or 18-22 weeks (cockerels)
  • a main flock setup for my layers and my 3 BCM roosters.

 

I have to handle the birds individually at each transition, so banding at those events is no extra work. Hopefully I can figure out how to make a loose enough zip tie that will stay on from 4 weeks to 12. I'll reband the cockerels at 12 weeks also.

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