BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Managing Your Flock › HELP!!!!!! Dry and scaly legs!!!!!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

HELP!!!!!! Dry and scaly legs!!!!!!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

HI everybody ok well i have noticed that alot of my chickens have dry scaly legs. t i dont think its mites because a have checked and cant find any. their legs look bad. there all scaly and white. what should i do to treat them and how should i prevent it?? PLS HELP  

post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChickenGuy53 View Post
 

HI everybody ok well i have noticed that alot of my chickens have dry scaly legs. t i dont think its mites because a have checked and cant find any. their legs look bad. there all scaly and white. what should i do to treat them and how should i prevent it?? PLS HELP  

You can't see leg mites, they are under the leg scales.

If leg scales are raised and crusty, they probably have leg mites.

Post a pic and someone can confirm or deny.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #3 of 9

Please do post pic.

 

Personally interested in how you can tell normal shedding of old scales vs mite infestations.

Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply

Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflour View Post
 

Please do post pic.

 

Personally interested in how you can tell normal shedding of old scales vs mite infestations.

I'm not sure old scales shed and regrow, like feathers molt, do they??...always wondered.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

I'm not sure old scales shed and regrow, like feathers molt, do they??...always wondered.

They shed and regrow those leg scales once a year.

Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply

Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflour View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

I'm not sure old scales shed and regrow, like feathers molt, do they??...always wondered.

They shed and regrow those leg scales once a year.

Do they really?? Why have I never seen any mention of it?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Do they really?? Why have I never seen any mention of it?

It's hard to find references, but here's one with the following comment:  http://www.ruleworks.co.uk/poultry/poultry-age.asp

 

"Also, the scales on older birds will tend to look rougher, particulary at the joints between the toes and the foot.

A new set of scales grows every year and, if the previous set is not completely shed, the build-up leads to roughness."

 

 

Others references I have found have too many "cookies" on site to drop on you.

 

 

But it makes sense that one set could not last a chicken or other bird their whole life.  

 

Reptiles scale shedding is easy to research and find.

Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply

Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflour View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Do they really?? Why have I never seen any mention of it?

It's hard to find references, but here's one with the following comment:  http://www.ruleworks.co.uk/poultry/poultry-age.asp

 

"Also, the scales on older birds will tend to look rougher, particulary at the joints between the toes and the foot.

A new set of scales grows every year and, if the previous set is not completely shed, the build-up leads to roughness."

 

 

Others references I have found have too many "cookies" on site to drop on you.

 

 

But it makes sense that one set could not last a chicken or other bird their whole life.  

 

Reptiles scale shedding is easy to research and find.

Sweet! Thanks! Going to copy into my thread.

I am just amazed that I've never seen any reference to it here on BYC or in my googling.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Sweet! Thanks! Going to copy into my thread.

I am just amazed that I've never seen any reference to it here on BYC or in my googling.

Thanks for the comment.

 

It just makes sense to me and tried several phrasings before could find any googled support of the idea.

Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply

Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Managing Your Flock
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Managing Your Flock › HELP!!!!!! Dry and scaly legs!!!!!!