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Moving into coop

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
I have a hen who has been totally free range, no coop. I just moved her and her 10 2 week old chicks into a coop. Want to keep them safer than just a fenced yard.

How long should i keep all of them inside the coop so that they go back into it at night when i finally let them free range during the day?

She was given to me as a gift and i didnt have a coop but used a dog crate. She and our rooster decided they preferred a tree at night. Will they ever start using the coop?
post #2 of 4
I wouldn't want 2 week old chicks free ranging. Too easy to get picked off. I leave mine locked up until they are at least 6 weeks or big enough for a cat to leave alone.
post #3 of 4

If the chicks are with the broody hen, they will sleep where she sleeps. If you can convince her that the best spot is inside the coop, then the chicks, and probably the rooster will follow.

 

I just made a new coop myself (thanks to a wonderful son in law) and I put a little feed right outside the door and a little inside the door, and got them to go in and look around. 

 

Mrs K

Western South Dakota Rancher
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Western South Dakota Rancher
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post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by revmichael View Post

I have a hen who has been totally free range, no coop. I just moved her and her 10 2 week old chicks into a coop. Want to keep them safer than just a fenced yard.

How long should i keep all of them inside the coop so that they go back into it at night when i finally let them free range during the day?

She was given to me as a gift and i didnt have a coop but used a dog crate. She and our rooster decided they preferred a tree at night. Will they ever start using the coop?

One to two weeks.

 

Do you have a run?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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