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Another pecking order question

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

We have 2 5wk old orpingtons and one 7wk old sussex. For our "adult" flock we have a 6mo old rooster and 2 silkie hens about 1.5yrs old. We got our baby chicks a week and a half ago, and a created a cage out of a plastic tote and put it in the henhouse with the adults. At first the adult would not go in unless they were going to lay. I had to coax them in at night. About 2 days ago they started to go in by themselves at night. Is this a sign that the baby chicks are slowly becoming part of the flock? So today we put the chicks in the run and left the adults inside the coop. After an hour we let the adults come out and take a look see. They all looked at each other kind of how dogs do. Everyone parted ways but i noticed only one of my adult hens was pecking any chick that got too close. She never targeted "just because" Some of it was instigated bc the chicks started to fly about. Is this becoming a good sign with more time or is this going to completely blow up in my face. I have pics in some of my albums so you all can see my set up.

post #2 of 8
It's normal for adult birds to peck any young one that is in it's space or doesn't move out of the way, so I wouldn't be concerned unless someone is being chased down. Sounds like things are going well.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhenlikesdogs View Post

It's normal for adult birds to peck any young one that is in it's space or doesn't move out of the way, so I wouldn't be concerned unless someone is being chased down. Sounds like things are going well.


Agreed. The little ones are being taught basic chicken manners by the adult. It can all seem a bit harsh from a human point of view, but thats how chicken society works. As long as there's no blood being drawn, i'd say all is well. Having a couple of feeding stations will help lower pecking and give the little ones an opportunity to eat.

 

CT

Nairobi, Kenya
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Nairobi, Kenya
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post #4 of 8

A 6 months old male is a cockerel, not an 'adult' cock/rooster until a year old.

 

Curious as to how your adult silkies get along with the 6mo cockerel?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Oh wow. Didn't not know there was a difference when it came down to age. They don't mind him one bit. They follow him everywhere he goes, and he let's them know he is in charge. And our cockerel is a silkie as well. Maybe that's why they get along so well
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inspektor View Post

Oh wow. Didn't not know there was a difference when it came down to age. They don't mind him one bit. They follow him everywhere he goes, and he let's them know he is in charge. And our cockerel is a silkie as well. Maybe that's why they get along so well

Well, wondered when you got the cockerel...and how quickly he was accepted by the hens.

Usually hen kick the butt of young cockerels for quite awhile before they accept them.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 8
I have found hens are so desperate for a rooster that they will accept them quickly, especially if they haven't had a rooster and are a bit older.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Aart,
Our cockerel we let our silkie hen hatch
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