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Do you wash your eggs? - Page 2

post #11 of 14

You're right!  I might want to consider being less of a smart aleck....I'll have to think on that awhile.  Until then, I hope you have a better day tomorrow! 

:frow

 

 


Edited by Beekissed - 12/11/15 at 8:22pm
 
A righteous man regardeth the life of his beast: but the tender mercies of the wicked are cruel.  Proverbs 12:10
 
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A righteous man regardeth the life of his beast: but the tender mercies of the wicked are cruel.  Proverbs 12:10
 
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post #12 of 14

I am not posting to get into any debates, just wanting to give the proper ways of washing to the original poster should they wish to wash their eggs safely....

 

 

Quote:

Hatching Eggs 101

Choose eggs that are of good size, not abnormally big or small. Do NOT set dirty, cracked, or porous eggs. 

Clinical studies at the University of Arkansas have shown that if your going to set a dirty egg, set the dirty egg, DO NOT SAND, WASH OR WIPE dirty eggs as hatchability decreases with these practices!

Cuticula is the thin membrane that covers the whole eggshell that is made from the sticky fluid when laid which covers it and quickly dissolves due to carbondioxyde activity. 

This membrane can be penetrated by gasses but functions as a kind defensive mechanism to prevent the entry of bacteria.

 

 The washing and rubbing action also serves to force disease organisms through the pores of the shell. Place the eggs upright in an egg carton with the FAT, air cell end of the egg UP! Allow eggs to sit in a moderately cool, somewhat humid place for storage. Basements are great. Moderately cool means 55-65 degrees. Rotate your eggs a 3 times a day to keep the embryo from sticking. An easy way to turn all of the eggs at once is to place a thick book under one end of the carton, and later remove the book and put it under the other end of the carton, 3 times a day. Before adding eggs to the incubator always WARM eggs UP slowly to room temperature. IF THE EGGS ARE COLD Condensation can cause bacterial growth on the eggs! You can collect eggs up until 10 days or so, but after the 7th day lower hatch rates may result. 

Stored eggs take longer to hatch (about one hour per day of storage).

if you must wash using water warmer than the egg using warm water

as to not force bacteria into the egg( thermal properties) 1T bleach per gal.

It is important to ALWAYS wash your hands before handling your hatching eggs!

 

Omphalitis, yolk sack infection is caused by a bacterium that enters through the porous egg shell and easily kills embryo's and newly hatched chicks. Unfortunately, incubation conditions are ideal for breeding bacteria as well as incubating eggs. For more information on storing eggs refer to  Recommendations for hatching egg handling and storage

 

Egg Cleaning Procedures

for the Backyard Flock

 

http://food.unl.edu/documents/EggCleaning.pdf

 

 

note Tek-Trol Disinfectant Cleaner Concentrate is a better bleach alternative!

 


Edited by Sally Sunshine - 12/12/15 at 4:54am
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sally Sunshine View Post
 

I am not posting to get into any debates, just wanting to give the proper ways of washing to the original poster should they wish to wash their eggs safely....

 

 

 

 

no debates intended but  clearly hatchability is not decreased by washing, myself and nearly every hatchery i know of wash and have excellent hatch rates in the 90 percents.  the four commercial hatchery i've been in (three chicken and one quail) all wash and disinfect with cold water and chemicals under pressure (pretty much an egg car wash) if hatch rates were decreased they simply would not do it because it costs time and money and commercial hatchery are all about the bottom line of profit. 

 

if you don't want to wash your eggs that's fine, if you do, that's fine too and there are no disadvantages to doing so as it's been proven many times over. 

post #14 of 14

I agree as well, however since we are handling with our hands and stuff and commercial industries have pressure washers with perfectly adjusted pressures and no hands on, they are made for washing and not over washing or under washing, perfect set chemicals and dryers with trays.  We have to always remember when comparing incubation methods... commercial vs home vs hen......  food for thought ;) 

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