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Having a feathered family, an emotional exercise? - Page 2

post #11 of 18

I've lost some to illness some to injury and some to following stupid incubator instructions, spent many a sleepless night tending the best way possible trying to save one of them, some I am able to some I am not. but between kids and the animals don't have time to dwell on it as much because when you have animals it don't matter if your tired sick or what not, they depend on you to take care of them too.

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 

I really appreciate reading all of the posts.  It is true that life goes on for the living and I too try to focus on what I have vs what I have lost, The survivors are still dependent on our care.  I do think that is my motivation to continue the ride. No matter what I do though the roller coaster ride never ends.  I was just wondering when I started this post if I was on it alone.  I see now that I am not.  I still think there is a lesson here for all of us, Im just not sure what it is.

-Robin-
Let your life speak for you...it is said, "How you live your life speaks so loudly that others can't hear what you are saying anyway."
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-Robin-
Let your life speak for you...it is said, "How you live your life speaks so loudly that others can't hear what you are saying anyway."
Reply
post #13 of 18

Lobzi, I think it is no matter what the situation, there is someone there that can identify with you and a great community here for support and ideas

 

needs more coffee before posting lol


Edited by slordaz - 12/11/15 at 7:22am
post #14 of 18

There are more risks of suffering emotional highs and lows when you keep chickens as opposed to other more conventional pets because they have relatively short life spans and there are generally more of them than when you just have cats and dogs. And let's face it, there are probably more diseases that can claim you pet chickens than ones that can infect cats and dogs.

 

And it always depends on the chicken keeper's own temperament. Some people bond more deeply with animals than others do. There's no shame in it.

post #15 of 18

Thanks for this thread….

My husband is very frustrated with how attached to my birds I have become. I am actually surprised at how much I adore them too. I got them as pets- but I truly value each one (5 hens and 1 duck and 1 drake). They have their own personalities…and especially since I raised them from a couple days old, I feel rather accomplished since they are now 27 weeks old and starting to lay eggs.

 

I live in constant fear of an illness, parasite, predator attack, cannabalism or hypothermia…

 

But I am constantly worried and stressing about them…the second something doesn't seem right I am googling it. I leave my bedroom window open at night so that if there is any abnormal noise, I will hear it and I can check on them. I second guess everything I am doing: Big enough coop? Free range or not? Worm or not? Did I buy the right food? Am I feeding too many treats? Should I buy them vegetables? Use DE or not? Heat coop or not? etc etc. 

 

Now with a vacation coming up- I am worried about them- and afraid that I will not be able to relax while away. I CANNOT tell my husband how worried I am about my birds…he likes them but he said they are "backyard pets". And these are not my only pets- I have 2 dogs, 1 cat, and 2 elderly pythons. I was hoping to get another horse in the spring, but I do not think that is going to happen because my hubby thinks I have gone mad.

 

For those that have chickens as pets…have you been able to relax at all and not worry as much? Or am I doomed to be like this as long as I have these birds?

post #16 of 18

Yes, you come to relax more as  you have your chickens longer. I've had mine around nine years, and the learning curve with chickens can be pretty steep. Those first couple years, I was making stupid mistakes that ended up killing some. For example, not knowing that chickens can't resist drinking from puddles, I ignorantly used insecticide in some planters, watered and lost a hen after she drank from the puddle under the planter.

 

Learning to tell when your chickens are sick and treating them instead of missing those important symptoms and having them die is another one that experience definitely helps. Learning the difference between sick poop and normal poop is another early warning sign that a lot of novice chicken keepers miss. Many of these things you just have to pick up as you go along, and you gain confidence the longer you have your chickens.

 

Another worry chicken keepers have is predators. Learning what predators are likely to be a problem in your area will help you to design safeguards into your coop and run so you won't have to worry about that, enabling you to relax more, even when you're on vacation.

post #17 of 18
I would agree, after twenty years of tweaking my husbandry I have mostly figured out what I need to do to raise them up and keep them healthy for my region, the rest is up to the individual bird, like every other creature out there, some live longer than others and some are prone to problems, I do what I can and I accept the loses as they happen. I think once you are more familiar with keeping chickens you'll realize that most problems you can prevent and others you have no control over.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #18 of 18

I have to say that I get very attached to them and very worried for every thing that is going wrong with them.  They are definitely my pets!!  I just had a baby cross beak chick die:(  I tried to help her and give her special attention by bringing her in my room while she ate, and she would fly up on my shoulder while I did my homework:)  It was very hard when she passed:(  I applaud anyone who can live the "farm" life if you will, where they do what they need to do to make room for new chickens and animals, but I could never do that.  One of my chickens was just on a week long journey to find out what was the matter with her poop and I was so uptight!  But, they bring me so much joy and laughter also:)  It is very much like a roller coaster:)

The girls:

Easter Eggers-Coconut, Gold n' Plump, Stir Fry

Australorps-Curry, Minnie, Kung Poa, Blossom

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The girls:

Easter Eggers-Coconut, Gold n' Plump, Stir Fry

Australorps-Curry, Minnie, Kung Poa, Blossom

Reply
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