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Humidity

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

I know humidity is important, but have you ever wondered how a hen can hatch eggs in a dry climate (low humidity) as well as in a high humidity climate like Tahiti, where it is like living in a sauna. Theoretically in Tahiti the eggs would never evaporate enough water to hatch, but they do. A dry environment is possibly more manageable as the hen may dampen herself down and then sit on the eggs, but how would a hen ever lower humidity?

post #2 of 3

I agree completely. A hen can't control ambient temperature or humidity. She can only control the space under her and she doesn't have a de-humidifier.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #3 of 3

Good question, some say their eggs are less porous and in some areas they have more stuff in the soil that makes that happen too:hu it is known that fowl take water in their beaks and put it in their nests though. Also I read in some abstracts that the clutch ph/composition is different to compensate.  who knows, its amazing this world of ours. 

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