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Eggtopsy

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I had 4 copper maran eggs that were late to hatch days after the others. After day 25 I did an Eggtopsy and found they were all mal positioned, had unabsorbed yolks and a greenish hue to the abdominals. There was no odor, but I sliced one open and a bunch of green fluid poured out. Does anyone know what this is and how I can prevent it next time. I had three other eggs that hatched fine. 1 Silkie, 1 Favorelle, and 1 maran.

Any info is greatly appreciated.
post #2 of 6

Could be so many things. You may want to check this link.

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/hatchability-problem-analysis

In a nutshell

Malpositions could be

  1. Eggs set small end up or in horizontal position.
  2. Inadequate or improper turning.
  3. High or low incubator temperature.
  4. High humidity.
  5. Old breeders.
  6. Round-shaped eggs or very large eggs.
  7. Nutritional deficiencies, especially vitamin A and vitamin B12.
  8. Eggs handled or stored improperly.
  9. Retarded development.

Unabsorbed yolk could be

  1. Inadequate turning, resulting in decreased embryonic membrane development and nutrient absorption.
  2. Humidity too high during incubation or after transfer.
  3. Incubator temperature too low.
  4. Hatcher temperature too high.
  5. Eggs chilled (e.g., at transfer).
  6. Nutritional deficiencies.
  7. Heredity.
  8. Embryological development accident.
  9. Breeder diseases.
  10. Inadequate ventilation.
  11. Prolonged egg storage.

 

Possible nutritional deficiencies in the breeder flock a month prior to hatch should never be ignored.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
I had purchased these eggs from someone local and sometime during incubation, we had a 4 hour power outage. I've never seen that color green before and was curious if it was normal or some type of bacterial infection. This was my first time incubating eggs not of my own flock and I know bacteria and e.coli can be an issue in these situations.
post #4 of 6

Bacteria would usually cause early death of the embryo, not at the hatching stage.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by misserink View Post

I had 4 copper maran eggs that were late to hatch days after the others. After day 25 I did an Eggtopsy and found they were all mal positioned, had unabsorbed yolks and a greenish hue to the abdominals. There was no odor, but I sliced one open and a bunch of green fluid poured out. Does anyone know what this is and how I can prevent it next time. I had three other eggs that hatched fine. 1 Silkie, 1 Favorelle, and 1 maran.

Any info is greatly appreciated.


I agree with cc on this, however the looks of this do tend to lead to Omphalitis, which could have been caused by a bacterium that enters through the porous egg shell. Unfortunately, incubation conditions are ideal for breeding bacteria as well as incubating eggs.  I actually had researched this at one point... have a look... The only prevention IF it is clean handling/turning, and cleaning that bator.  sometimes people let that water in the bator get nasty with mold. thats not good either.


Here is an article I wrote for helping others  

Quote:

: Mushy Chick Disease

Omphalitis

Also known as

Mushy Chick Disease & Yolk Sack infection

                                                                                                     http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/mushy-chick-disease-yolk-sack-infection-omphalit

is

 

 

Also gonna throw this on here in case you need to ever clean really nasty eggs you have it....

 

Quote:Hatching Eggs 101

Choose eggs that are of good size, not abnormally big or small. Do NOT set dirty, cracked, or porous eggs. 

Clinical studies at the University of Arkansas have shown that if your going to set a dirty egg, set the dirty egg, DO NOT SAND, WASH OR WIPE dirty eggs as hatchability decreases with these practices!

Cuticula is the thin membrane that covers the whole eggshell that is made from the sticky fluid when laid which covers it and quickly dissolves due to carbondioxyde activity. 

This membrane can be penetrated by gasses but functions as a kind defensive mechanism to prevent the entry of bacteria.

 

 The washing and rubbing action also serves to force disease organisms through the pores of the shell. Place the eggs upright in an egg carton with the FAT, air cell end of the egg UP! Allow eggs to sit in a moderately cool, somewhat humid place for storage. Basements are great. Moderately cool means 55-65 degrees. Rotate your eggs a 3 times a day to keep the embryo from sticking. An easy way to turn all of the eggs at once is to place a thick book under one end of the carton, and later remove the book and put it under the other end of the carton, 3 times a day. Before adding eggs to the incubator always WARM eggs UP slowly to room temperature. IF THE EGGS ARE COLD Condensation can cause bacterial growth on the eggs! You can collect eggs up until 10 days or so, but after the 7th day lower hatch rates may result. 

Stored eggs take longer to hatch (about one hour per day of storage).

if you must wash using water warmer than the egg using warm water

as to not force bacteria into the egg( thermal properties) 1T bleach per gal.

It is important to ALWAYS wash your hands before handling your hatching eggs!

 

Omphalitis, yolk sack infection is caused by a bacterium that enters through the porous egg shell and easily kills embryo's and newly hatched chicks. Unfortunately, incubation conditions are ideal for breeding bacteria as well as incubating eggs. For more information on storing eggs refer to  Recommendations for hatching egg handling and storage

 

Egg Cleaning Procedures

for the Backyard Flock

 

http://food.unl.edu/documents/EggCleaning.pdf

 

 

note Tek-Trol Disinfectant Cleaner Concentrate is a better bleach alternative!

 

 

 

 

AND one last thing   KEEPING MOLD OUT OF THE BATOR post #1644

post #6 of 6

OH!!  and welcome to BYC!!! :frow  congrats on your hatch too!!!  

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