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First time incubating...shipped eggs

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
Hi all!! So, i am doing everything backwards. Starting with shipped eggs and I will end up having a staggered hatch as well. Phew. I like the challenge.
I have eggs coming in the mail today, tomorrow and at the end of the week. I'll let today's eggs( d'uccles ) sit till tomorrow night and put them in the bator tomorrow night with tomorrow's eggs ( isbars). Then add the last bunch Friday/Saturday ( cream legbars ) after they get a chance to settle. I have a few questions, and plan to keep this post updated with progress!

I've had my bator on for two days now and the temp is holding steady at 100. ( still air hovabator ). Should I raise the temp a bit to 101? Or is it good?

I know to let the eggs settle after shipping. I've been reading mixed opinions on turning shipped eggs though. After I set them, should I leave them along for 5 days or so to continue settling and reattaching air sacs? Then begin turning them? And, when I start turning them, should I put them on their sides in the bator, for the rest of the incubation, or leave them fat side up? What is better with shipped eggs?
post #2 of 3

http://msucares.com/poultry/reproductions/poultry_temp.html

post #3 of 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirlo357 View Post

Hi all!! So, i am doing everything backwards. Starting with shipped eggs and I will end up having a staggered hatch as well. Phew. I like the challenge.
I have eggs coming in the mail today, tomorrow and at the end of the week. I'll let today's eggs( d'uccles ) sit till tomorrow night and put them in the bator tomorrow night with tomorrow's eggs ( isbars). Then add the last bunch Friday/Saturday ( cream legbars ) after they get a chance to settle. I have a few questions, and plan to keep this post updated with progress!

I've had my bator on for two days now and the temp is holding steady at 100. ( still air hovabator ). Should I raise the temp a bit to 101? Or is it good?

I know to let the eggs settle after shipping. I've been reading mixed opinions on turning shipped eggs though. After I set them, should I leave them along for 5 days or so to continue settling and reattaching air sacs? Then begin turning them? And, when I start turning them, should I put them on their sides in the bator, for the rest of the incubation, or leave them fat side up? What is better with shipped eggs?

yes you should have the temp higher in a still air.  Welcome to BYC @kirlo357 :frow WOW some great breeds too!!! 

 

I put a ton of info here to help others Hatching Eggs 101  I will paste a bit of it for you because I think it helps to understand why you need to do certain things during incubation!   please understand that what you need to do is get the internal temp of the egg to 99.5-100.5  Some people that use still air only do 101.5 at the top of the eggs, it depends on your bator and turner and other stuff, its best to chat with others....

 

DO YOU understand humidity and its not a set number?  we are always on this thread you are welcome to jump on any time its typically faster and tons of people prob have your bator..... INCUBATING w/FRIENDS! come hatch, learn, Chat, Meet new Friends!

 

Quote:
 

TEMPERATURE

Never trust the thermometer that comes with the incubator, always check it.

The thermometer that came with my incubator was off by 5 degrees.

That could mean life or death for your babies.

 

Did you know "The yolk is orange and on its surface is a visible germinal disc; radiating from this area is the more watery white

yolk, which is less dense. During turning, the yolk’s structure makes the part containing the germinal disc stay most dorsal (closest to the incubating bird) for heating"

 

With a Forced Air Incubator (fan model) you can get the best hatch rate by keeping the temperature at 99.5º F. throughout the entire incubation period. HOWEVER, when using a Still Air incubator (no fan) at 102º F. The reason for different temperatures is that with a fan model the circulating air warms all around the egg while still air temperatures are warmer at the top of the egg than at the bottom. The temperature is measured at the level where the embryos develop (at the top of the HORIZONTAL egg). NOTE:  If the eggs are in vertical position, elevate the thermometer just below the top of the egg. The temperature is measured at the level where the embryos develop (at the top of the egg). Never allow the thermometer to touch the eggs or incubator because incorrect readings can result. A high temperature tends to produce early hatches. A consistently cooler temperature tends to increase incubation times and produce weakened chicks. In both cases the total chicks hatched will be reduced.  Prepare your incubator and run it for several days before adding eggs, to be positive you are maintaining correct incubation temperature.  NOTE: It is common that when adding eggs the temperature will drop but should come back up to correct temperature within an hour or two. Don’t rest the thermometer's bulb touching the eggs or the incubator. Incorrect readings will result. Did you know that 10/13 day old embryos begin to produce excess heat in the incubator? Most large commercial incubators will spend more time cooling than heating!

 

Why Measure eggshell temperature?

http://www.aviagen.com/assets/Tech_Center/BB_Resources_Tools/Hatchery_How_Tos/03HowTo3MeasureEggShellTemperature.pdf

 

 

 CALIBRATION! YES! It’s IMPORTANT!

Calibrate the thermometer/s you are using for your Incubator. I use 3 thermometers! You need to make sure your thermometer is reading correctly, Even one degree may cause serious problems with your hatch!  A simple method without specialized instruments and knowledge is to compare your thermometer/hygrometer with other devices.

 

CALIBRATION of thermometers:

Freezing point method.

Fill a glass with crushed ice. Add a LITTLE clean water until the glass is full and stir. Wait 3 minutes then insert the thermometer tip into the ice-filled glass so it’s in the water ice mixture. Wait a minute and if the thermometer reads 32 F then it’s accurate, and if it does not, it requires calibration.

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