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Aggressive rooster - Page 2

post #11 of 15

A good flock protector is one that is always on the alert for threats of all kinds, and analyzes new situations and beings to see if they are a threat. A rooster is not going to just instinctively know that a child is not a danger, got to give the guy credit for being on the alert and having the courage to stand up to a person even if he did not know what it is or what it is capable of. It is not good that he attacks kids, but it is not like he is doing it to be evil on purpose. Give the dude chance; just let him know that you are top rooster. He is trying to show his dominance and protect his family, he does not know any better. The roosters that people like because they never challenge people and are all lovey and 100 percent docile often do diddly squat when it comes to protecting the flock in a danger situation. 

 

   40 waxing and waning free-range birds.
 I truly love animals, both male and female, large and small, regardless of how important humans may shallowly deem them.
I will always miss my Dovey Love.
 
 
 
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   40 waxing and waning free-range birds.
 I truly love animals, both male and female, large and small, regardless of how important humans may shallowly deem them.
I will always miss my Dovey Love.
 
 
 
Reply
post #12 of 15
Most roosters do diddly squat to protect the flock anyways, sure they may keep an eye out and sound the alarm to run for cover but many will beat the hens to the hen house when trouble comes around. Don't depend on a rooster as protection against real predators, and now that you have a grand daughter and possibly a wife who is scared of that rooster the odds of breaking him are even slimmer as those 2 people now will have to learn to be dominant to the rooster when their first instinct will be to run for the house in which case he will chase and flog them.

I have a friend who has a brown Leghorn who has never even had a cross look at him but he attacks his girlfriend and her daughter every time they come outside, in this roosters case I have advocated for him to remain amongst the living as I believe he is a good judge of character smile.png
Edited by blucoondawg - 12/15/15 at 8:54pm
post #13 of 15

:welcome

 

You say he protects the hens....does that mean you free range? I would not ever range a rooster who had attacked with a small child in the picture. If you don't free range, the hens don't need protecting. You little one needs protecting, she's way more important than the birds. So's your wife, but I'm thinking she's big enough to tell you that herself ;)

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 

Mrs. K, Thanks for your response and advice. You were exactly right about the unruly rooster. First my grand daughter, then my wife and now I cant even go in the run to collect the eggs without a weapon of some sort. I'm actually at work right now, I just got off the phone with my wife, shes a little upset to say the least with the rooster. Now shes on board with the idea of him leaving. I have a friend that has a large farm that wants him. He knows the behavior he's been displaying and still wants him. So thanks again for you response. Looking forward to being able to collect the eggs again without carrying a broom!

post #15 of 15
I've never used a broom on a rooster that is trying to spur me,I use my boot they usually learn quickly or end up in a mason jar. I never let anyone especially kids be around any rooster (no matter how gentle they seem) if Im not with them. I've been spurred, bitten, scratched and attacked by many a GENTLE ROO. anything carrying around 2" daggers should always be watched closely.
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