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Attached rooster? - Page 3

post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
He is with his ladies during the majority of the day now. At first they were separated just in case, but now they're able to be all together while the girls are put outside to acclimate to the cold weather. Like I said, he's been great with them. They can share food and be in the same area and I haven't seen any problems. I've been watching closely and then gradually backing off a little and watching from more of a distance. I think he comes running to me when I come out because I am the food and treat lady and was the first person he really bonded with.

A few years ago we adopted a dog who was highly aggressive with anyone other than myself and my husband. She was also incredibly protective of me and would try to go after anyone she perceived as harming me. Now before anyone spazzes out, she was always muzzled and contained when outside to avoid her harming anyone. She was also muzzled anytime she went anywhere or anyone came over. If someone even patted my arm she would go ballistic. I was the only one that she reacted to this way. I did behavior modification with her through the use of treats - muzzled but anytime someone walked in the door to our house she got a treat. Then worked up to the point where the guest would give her the treat. Eventually she was not muzzled and she is a completely different dog now. Zero aggression (well except for squeakers inside of toys that is). She hasn't been muzzled at all in probably close to two years even going to the vet and getting shots and teeth checked etc. If we have someone over the worst she will do now is try to drown them in kisses or show off her toys. We retrained her for treat=friend=happiness and love. She no longer requires treats when new people come over. And like I said, she is a very pleasant dog now and is no longer aggressive and has been able to meet new people and animals without issue or problems. I know that dogs are not the same as roosters but most animals respond to food. Which is why I was wondering if the very small amount of aggression we have seen so far with our rooster could be modified in the same way and if anyone has any experience with it.
post #22 of 27

I hope it works out with him, but dogs are way smarter than chickens, and roosters aren't always that trainable, especially over behavior that's basically not sensible in the first place.  Mary

post #23 of 27

Chickens really don't follow the dog and cat model of behavior. 

 

Roosters that are not afraid of people often times become very aggressive toward people, usually children first. Which is why the more experienced people on here asked right away if there were children. A small child can be vulnerable. I know we mostly sound heartless on here, but nearly all of us have had a rooster that we wished would be nice, and he wasn't.

 

There are people that recommend carrying the rooster around, some that recommend pushing his head down and holding him on the ground to show your mastery, establishing that you are higher in the pecking order. Many recommend chasing him a bit, so that he has to run away from you, and walking through him so that he backs up and gives you space, all signs of respect. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, Roosters are rather a crap shoot.

 

I did not always recognize the signs of aggressive behavior with a rooster that indicate that he is getting too brave and may attack. These are the ones I watch for, a couple that you have mentioned.

 

Excessive crowing when I come in

Puffing up, and flapping the wings

Coming towards me, and looking at me

Attacking

 

I personally like a rooster that keeps about 4-5 feet away from me, and mostly ignores me. They are not panicked, just giving me room to show respect.  Mine tend to keep somewhat between me and the flock, but not always. Mine generally approach the feed bowl first, and then call his hens over to see and admire this tremendous find he has found just for them. 

 

Roosters are a crap shoot, go through the archives, lots of people on here have been exactly where you are. Something about this bird is worrying you, or you would not have posted. 

 

Good luck, but be aware.

 

Mrs K


Edited by Mrs. K - 12/19/15 at 8:55pm
Western South Dakota Rancher
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Western South Dakota Rancher
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post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 
thanks. I'll be keeping a close eye on him. We did have a visitor yesterday with no issue and he kept his distance. He's such a beautiful boy I hope he's just adjusting to the change of the rehoming and not having a flock. The picture was taken just a little bit ago. When I sit outside he always runs over and he stands next to my chair and preens. After I went back inside, he resumed roaming around the yard with the dogs.
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by cassn View Post

thanks. I'll be keeping a close eye on him. We did have a visitor yesterday with no issue and he kept his distance. He's such a beautiful boy I hope he's just adjusting to the change of the rehoming and not having a flock. The picture was taken just a little bit ago. When I sit outside he always runs over and he stands next to my chair and preens. After I went back inside, he resumed roaming around the yard with the dogs.

He's pretty cool looking.....look at those feathered feet!!

Do keep us updated an how he works out.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by cassn View Post

I have read a lot of posts about different rooster behaviors but I didn't see any that covered this. Does anyone else have a problem with their rooster being super attached to them? He's fine around our immediate family, but if anyone else comes over to visit and interacts with me he tries to attack them. I work from home and he watches me work all day. He comes running to see me any time I am outside (which is admittedly adorable with his fluffy feathery legs). No one else in my family can pick him up or touch him unless he's in the coop at night but he will let me pick him up anytime. Some of the hens are being transitioned in the next few weeks into the coop full time and he's done well with them, but even when they're getting some time outside to acclimate to the weather he will still spend most of his time watching me. I love how gentle and calm he has been with the hens and I do love that he's my buddy and all, but I'm not thrilled at him attacking anyone who is unfamiliar and interacts with me.

 

 

I'm curious to know how things are going with your guy?  Also, how old is he? 

post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 

He's a little over a year old at this point from what we were told.  He's been doing fine lately.  The girls are out in the coop, although he has a separate coop right next to them because they're still a bit small if he's looking to get lucky.  He spends a lot of his time in front of their door hanging out and watching them.  When I go outside, he still comes over to hang out with me but seems to be calming down more now that the girls are outside and he can keep more of an eye on them. :)

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