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Homemade Feeder

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Built this guy today from some cedar boards and 2x6. It turned out great. It can hold something like 50-75lbs. Feels good to be able to feed them without opening door.



post #2 of 8

That's great! I'd love to be able to feed and water without opening up the coop. Any other pictures of how you put it together?

post #3 of 8

I'd be afraid moisture would seep in. Of course I have "water on the mind" with the recent weather here in PA.

Raising lots of fun poultry: Cream Legbars, Welbars, Bielefelders, California Greys, and 6 colors / sizes of Ameraucanas

Also Turkeys, Guineas and Peafowl

 

I have eggs and chicks available for sale from some of these breeds, details at my website

How to make a hoop tractor

My Poultry Blog

Reply

Raising lots of fun poultry: Cream Legbars, Welbars, Bielefelders, California Greys, and 6 colors / sizes of Ameraucanas

Also Turkeys, Guineas and Peafowl

 

I have eggs and chicks available for sale from some of these breeds, details at my website

How to make a hoop tractor

My Poultry Blog

Reply
post #4 of 8

Definitely susceptible to water infiltration...not to mention rodents and waste.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Definitely issues I have been thinking of (mostly due to recent weather).  Rodents I am not too terribly worried about as they can't "get to" it...unless they chew through wood of course.  I have a 5gallon feeder inside too.  I may just fill that up and keep that going to be honest.  If I can't find a good way of sealing it up, I may just use it for snacks, which is just fine.

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Really, I was looking for something convenient that I wouldn't have to go into coop.  But a 5 gallon bucket would keep them fed for a while, so really, should suffice.

post #7 of 8

Yeah, I have a 5-gallon bucket inside that keeps them going for a while. The doors to my coop open up the entire back side, so I'd been thinking it would be nice to be able to keep the heat in more during the winter (what little heat they make for themselves). But now that I think about it, I'm opening them more often to clean the droppings boards than to fill the feeder, anyway. :)

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by FranciscoR View Post
 

Definitely issues I have been thinking of (mostly due to recent weather).  Rodents I am not too terribly worried about as they can't "get to" it...unless they chew through wood of course.  I have a 5gallon feeder inside too.  I may just fill that up and keep that going to be honest.  If I can't find a good way of sealing it up, I may just use it for snacks, which is just fine.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FranciscoR View Post
 

Really, I was looking for something convenient that I wouldn't have to go into coop.  But a 5 gallon bucket would keep them fed for a while, so really, should suffice.

I like to co in coop everyday just to keep an eye on things.

You'd be surprised how small a hole a mouse can get thru.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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