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Lobster shells - Page 2

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

I use naturally shed dungeness shells. They wash up on the beaches year round, here. Sometimes the chickens get to them before I've even had a chance to wash them off (mischievous Barred Rocks), and they can peck them apart. They also get whatever oyster shells that the racoons and ravens drop around the property. I throw them on the driveway to get crushed. I very rarely have to pay for my flocks calcium. 

That may be an entirely different animal(haha!) figuratively literally.

The lobster shells, especially legs and claws, and snow and king crab legs I've had are very thick, hard and sharp.

Have cut my hands on them more than once, no way I'd give them to the chooks.

 

Guess you've got to use some discretion and common sense.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #12 of 12

If too hard for them to process they probably wont be able to peck it apart enough to ingest much.

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