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Soliciting for the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly - Page 3

post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 

I see you're point about crawling under a 10 x 10 area. I had consider that but thought the benefits to the chickens out weighed the ease of cleaning, etc.  I guess if it becomes a problem I could always reduce the area under the coop by putting up partitions.  

post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoonerFan918 View Post
 

I see you're point about crawling under a 10 x 10 area. I had consider that but thought the benefits to the chickens out weighed the ease of cleaning, etc.  I guess if it becomes a problem I could always reduce the area under the coop by putting up partitions.  

That's what I did, the 'under-runs' are only about 4 feet deep.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoonerFan918 View Post
 

I see you're point about crawling under a 10 x 10 area. I had consider that but thought the benefits to the chickens out weighed the ease of cleaning, etc.  I guess if it becomes a problem I could always reduce the area under the coop by putting up partitions.  


No doubt they would love to go underneath there.

 

I considered leaving mine open so they could get under the coop, but for me, it would be difficult, so it's more for MY convenience so I can maintain the run. I don't free range at all so the run needs a good cleaning out at least once a week and in the summer I do it about every 2-3 days, but that's just me. They are poop machines.:D

post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 
Yeah. I definitely want to keep it clean. I wonder if it's possible to fashion some type of light weight "tray" that you could slide in and out from under the coop to facilitate cleaning? 🤔
post #25 of 27

I don't try to 'clean' the run, instead add dry organic materials of varying sizes, shapes and content(dry leaves, ramial woodchips, straw, twigs, dry grass clippings, etc)

to help break down the feces and replace the volume of 'soil' that amazingly seems to 'disappear' after the first year....

.....they like to dig huge holes and fling the dirt and the soil will also compact.

 

It really helps keep the odor down during rain/snowmelt.

Get the organic layer deep enough and it will help 'absorb' the water runoff and provide habitat for micro and macro organisms that break down fecal matter.....

...and that chooks like to eat.


Edited by aart - 12/25/15 at 4:10am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

I don't try to 'clean' the run, instead add dry organic materials of varying sizes, shapes and content(dry leaves, ramial woodchips, straw, twigs, dry grass clippings, etc)
to help break down the feces and replace the volume of 'soil' that amazingly seems to 'disappear' after the first year....
.....they like to dig huge holes and fling the dirt and the soil will also compact.

It really helps keep the odor down during rain/snowmelt.
Get the organic layer deep enough and it will help 'absorb' the water runoff and provide habitat for micro and macro organisms that break down fecal matter.....
...and that chooks like to eat.

goodpost.gif
I do exactly that, and have never seemed to have excess poop problems in the run. It breaks down incredibly fast, and the soil is very rich!
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

I don't try to 'clean' the run, instead add dry organic materials of varying sizes, shapes and content(dry leaves, ramial woodchips, straw, twigs, dry grass clippings, etc)

to help break down the feces and replace the volume of 'soil' that amazingly seems to 'disappear' after the first year....

.....they like to dig huge holes and fling the dirt and the soil will also compact.

 

It really helps keep the odor down during rain/snowmelt.

Get the organic layer deep enough and it will help 'absorb' the water runoff and provide habitat for micro and macro organisms that break down fecal matter.....

...and that chooks like to eat.


Sounds like a great idea! I love learning how everyone does things, it gives me ideas to keep in my head for the future.

I do put leaves and pine needles in mine, they love to dig through it, but my  run is covered and stays for the most part, very dry, so I have no water runoff. This is why I clean mine constantly. The small area that is open to the elements doesn't get cleaned quite as often but I turn the dirt with a pitchfork in there. I have considered misting mine from time to time because even with all the rain we have had, it is a bit dusty. My garden and fields are flooded and have standing water right now, the yard and driveway is muddy, but alas my run is dry and dusty.

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