BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying › Quirky behavior after becoming a layer
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Quirky behavior after becoming a layer

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I've noticed a change in the behavior of my pullets that have started laying. That's part of why I know who is laying! I don't baby my chooks. They get feed am and pm otherwise are free ranging. Im not talking about the egg song either. Once they start laying, they are the first to look up when I come around. They're always hanging around the back door. They seem to have more of a human centered focus and have more mature behaviors among the flock. My first layer has been uncharacteristicly found sharing her food with the youngest flock mates, etc.
The funniest and most drastic change I've seen is in our young Buff Orpington, Blanche. She laid her first egg yesterday and her second today. She's always been very shy. The lowest in the ranks. She always moved away and would never willingly approach us. Wary when we'd throw treats and forego a treat if it meant confrontation or getting too close to us, etc....

When she came out of the coop today, she walked straight across the yard to the back door. Not another chicken in sight! She marched right up the back steps to the kitchen door and pecked on it. She just stood there when I opened the door proclaiming her song. It was so funny to see! She's like a different chicken now that she's laying. I wonder how long this will keep up.
post #2 of 5
This happened to my White Leghorn, she hated humans and then as soon as she started to lay, she would follow me everywhere!

I supposed after they have passed an egg out of their backside, humans don't seem as scary!
Four lovely hens : An Exbattery Hen, a Lavender Araucana, a Wheaten Marans and a Gold Laced Frizzle Polish
Two dogs and four cats.
If you want to read my chicken adventure, here it is :
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/947562/my-story-our-experience-join-me-on-my-adventure.
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Four lovely hens : An Exbattery Hen, a Lavender Araucana, a Wheaten Marans and a Gold Laced Frizzle Polish
Two dogs and four cats.
If you want to read my chicken adventure, here it is :
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/947562/my-story-our-experience-join-me-on-my-adventure.
Reply
post #3 of 5

Lots of BYCers have reported their pullets becoming more friendly once they begin to lay.

 

I've noticed it in my flock, too. Hormones do seem to affect them, coming and going.

 

It's all part of what makes keeping chickens such an absorbing endeavor.

post #4 of 5

Hmmm..... I've found that they often become less friendly.

But I have a cockbird, so maybe their affections/attentions switch to him after becoming mature?

 

Wonders if the increased pursuance of humans has to so with increased need of nutrition after producing eggs?

 

No doubt that their behaviors are almost constantly captivating if you take the time to observe closely.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Hmmm..... I've found that they often become less friendly.
But I have a cockbird, so maybe their affections/attentions switch to him after becoming mature?

Wonders if the increased pursuance of humans has to so with increased need of nutrition after producing eggs?

No doubt that their behaviors are almost constantly captivating if you take the time to observe closely.
I have two cockerels as well! My oldest is the same age as my oldest layers. His behavior is either changing as he matures or as his girls start laying. He has become so nurturing. Their egg songs or clucking waiting for the occupant in their favorite box to vacate make him come running with concern. I've found him pacing in the coop while the girls are on the boxes. He pokes his head in with them going to each clucking softly as though offering support. It's so sweet to see.
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