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Can a hen lay herself to death? - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cel45 View Post

Thanks guys, so let me ask another question. I do have oyster shell available, but they don't seem to eat it. Should I add some to their daily feed or throw some down with the stratch I throw for them daily?

They may not need it yet......and if you are feeding layer feed it already has enough calcium in it so they won't be using much of the oyster shell.

I'd just keep it in a separate container....they'll find it eventually.

 

Tho I admit, I did put a half dozen pieces in the feeder in the pullet coop...but I feed a high protein/low calcium feed.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #12 of 16

I would not put it in their feed, but I would always have it available to them. For my production hens, layer does not seem to have enough calcium, so they eat a lot of eggshells, but have never liked oyster shell. Mine are spoiled though.

 

   40 waxing and waning free-range birds.
 I truly love animals, both male and female, large and small, regardless of how important humans may shallowly deem them.
I will always miss my Dovey Love.
 
 
 
Reply

 

   40 waxing and waning free-range birds.
 I truly love animals, both male and female, large and small, regardless of how important humans may shallowly deem them.
I will always miss my Dovey Love.
 
 
 
Reply
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Free Feather View Post
 

I would not put it in their feed, but I would always have it available to them. For my production hens, layer does not seem to have enough calcium, so they eat a lot of eggshells, but have never liked oyster shell. Mine are spoiled though.

It goes thru them so fast that they don't absorb much of the calcium that in them.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

It goes thru them so fast that they don't absorb much of the calcium that in them.

I have heard that, and it makes sense. But I give them to the chickens anyways because what else am I going to do with them? They have oyster shell, too, they just rarely want to eat it. I crush it up with a hammer sometimes and mix it with yogurt as a treat every once in a while. Even some of my hens with really thin eggshells, who are eating grower do not want oyster shell.

 

   40 waxing and waning free-range birds.
 I truly love animals, both male and female, large and small, regardless of how important humans may shallowly deem them.
I will always miss my Dovey Love.
 
 
 
Reply

 

   40 waxing and waning free-range birds.
 I truly love animals, both male and female, large and small, regardless of how important humans may shallowly deem them.
I will always miss my Dovey Love.
 
 
 
Reply
post #15 of 16
If they are eating a formulated layer feed (a complete one you buy at the feed store) then that has enough calcium in it for your birds. The oyster shell is a good option to leave out though. Some birds may want to eat it but you don't have to add it to the food.
Edited by Chickerdoodle13 - 12/29/15 at 7:36am
"If we long for our planet to be important, there is something we can do about it. We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and by the depth of our answers." ~Carl Sagan

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"If we long for our planet to be important, there is something we can do about it. We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and by the depth of our answers." ~Carl Sagan

"We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem." ~Douglas Adams
Reply
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks again, yes, they are on layer and they free range in the yard during the day. I also leave a pan of layer oit in the yard for them in addition to the coop run. Just some of the talk about problems with sex links like the ISA Browns has me concerned.
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