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Does my bigger run need a fenced-in bottom - Page 2

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by beb444 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post

What kind of staples did you use? Staples like you use in an office to staple paper together, ¾” poultry staples, fencing staples over an inch long (can’t remember exact length but maybe 1-1/4”), or did you use a construction type staple gun? I’m sorry but the word “staple” doesn’t tell me a lot about how strong that connection is. If it is for hawk protection it doesn’t have to be very strong. If it’s for dogs or raccoons, it needs to be stronger.

How strong was the wood you stapled into? If it’s flimsy it’s hard to drive a staple in with a hammer. Some wood splits pretty easily so the staple might not hold really well. If the wood is solid and you used a substantial staple it can be really strong.

I use a lot of different things to connect wire, depending on why I’m putting it up and what I’m connecting to. For wire to wire like attaching an apron I might use J-Clips if the wire is small gauge, hog rings if it is heavier gauge, or connect it using other wire. If the wood is substantial I might use the ¾” poultry staples if I want to keep poultry in or the larger fencing staples to keep things out. Some people use fender washers on screws to attach hardware cloth, especially if the wood is kind of flimsy so you can’t drive a staple, but I don’t. I take a furring strip (a piece of wood maybe ½” to a better ¾” thick), drill a pilot hole through that to prevent splitting and make it easier to install, and screw that over the end of the wire or hardware cloth. I make sure the screw goes through a hole in the hardware cloth and often use a fender washer to help hold better. If you clamp that down tight it’s about as strong a connection as you can get plus the wood covers the sharp ends of the hardware cloth.

Connections are often the weak point in your construction but you kind of need to match the connection to what you are connecting and why.


I used the type you would use for construction, I bought the gun and the staples at Home depot.  But that makes me feel better that it doesn't have to be that strong for hawks. I don't have to worry about dogs where the coop is but I do for coyotes, etc.The wood we purchased new also at home depot and it is solid.  Thank you for the suggestions!! I might do the wood to cloth to wood thing!  Do the predators pull hard or scratch? Would they get scared away if the mesh fell on them and made a loud noise?

Is it an air driven gun?

How long are the staples.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Is it an air driven gun?

How long are the staples.


this is the link for the gun  http://www.homedepot.com/p/Arrow-Fastener-T50-5-in-Staple-and-Nail-Gun-5700/100049752 because I don't know if it's air driven or what.:P  On the packaging for the staples is says T50, 5/16", 8 mm

The girls:

Easter Eggers-Coconut, Gold n' Plump, Stir Fry

Australorps-Curry, Minnie, Kung Poa, Blossom

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The girls:

Easter Eggers-Coconut, Gold n' Plump, Stir Fry

Australorps-Curry, Minnie, Kung Poa, Blossom

Reply
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 


@Ridgerunner you seem to be very knowledgeable of predators so I'm going to ask you one more question...I'm sorry:rolleyes: Do predators break in to runs and coops during the day or just at night?

The girls:

Easter Eggers-Coconut, Gold n' Plump, Stir Fry

Australorps-Curry, Minnie, Kung Poa, Blossom

Reply

The girls:

Easter Eggers-Coconut, Gold n' Plump, Stir Fry

Australorps-Curry, Minnie, Kung Poa, Blossom

Reply
post #14 of 14
Some predators hunt mostly at night, some mostly during the day. Most hunt both day and night. If you read through enough of these threads you will find posts of attacks day and night. I’ve seen foxes, bobcats, mink, coyotes, snakes, skunks, rats, mice, raccoons, and even a possum out in the middle of the day. Many people will tell you that these only come out at night. Not even close. I thought possums were purely nocturnal until I saw on feeding at my compost pile at 1:00 on a bright sunny day. That surprised me, but he entered the trap that night. Hawks hunt during the day and owls at night, but both can be out at dawn and dusk. Dogs of course hunt day and night. Dogs are probably the biggest danger for most of us.

Nighttime is the time of highest danger. Many of the predators I’ve listed are more nocturnal, but there is a lot less human activity at night. We frighten many of them away with our activity during the day but they have a lot more undisturbed time to do their mischief at night. There are still plenty of posts where a fox or bobcat nabbed a chicken within a few feet of a human in the middle of the day.

I use a strategy of a predator resistant run during the day and lock them in a fairly predator proof coop at night. I have a 12’ x 32’ mostly covered run that will stop almost anything and a large area inside electric netting during the day. It works pretty well. I’ve still found several snakes in my coop, day and night. I once found a possum in my coop at dusk when I went down to lock them up. I found a skunk inside my run one night after dark. Never did figure out how he got in for sure but I enclosed that run with an apron after that.

It can be challenging and really expensive to make everything totally predator proof, especially if your facilities are of a decent size. I just do the best I reasonably can and it has worked pretty well, but I’m not perfect.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply
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