BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance › question regarding pine shavings - A friend said it was bad for gardens due to turpentine
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question regarding pine shavings - A friend said it was bad for gardens due to turpentine

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Is this true? Since I have found that pine shavings work the best in our coop as they chickens won't keeps the straw under the roosts instead they move it around so much that I just have bare wood floors beneath them. Just curious if I need to figure something else out. I just have been buying the pine shavings at a local store.
post #2 of 7

I've hauled a lot of horse and chicken bedding to my garden, the neighbor's garden, and my pastures.  No problem!  Mary

post #3 of 7

I used pine shavings on my garden for years with no problems whatever.

The obscure we understand eventually. 
The obvious takes a little longer.
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The obscure we understand eventually. 
The obvious takes a little longer.
Reply
post #4 of 7

I can't imagine the shavings have turpentine on them? that's kind of bizarre IMO. My shavings I buy are just pine shavings, nothing else. And like the above, I've been using them on my garden for years and years with no issues. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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post #5 of 7

Most pine shavings bought in compressed bales at the farm stores are kiln dried, so no sap.

Sap is gathered and distilled to make turpentine....much like maple sap is gathered and boiled down to make syrup.

 

Wood shavings can be 'bad' for gardens because they use up nitrogen as they decompose, robbing it from the growing plants.


Edited by aart - 1/3/16 at 5:27am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Most pine shavings bought in compressed bales at the farm stores are kiln dried, so no sap.

Sap is gathered and distilled to make turpentine....much like maple sap is gathered and boiled down to make syrup.

 

Wood shavings can be 'bad' for gardens because they use up nitrogen as they decompose, robbing it from the growing plants.


What you say aart makes sense.

 

In my coop I use pine shavings with no ill effects on my garden.

Then again chicken poop being the strongest manure known to mankind  Probably compensates for any nitrogen robbed out of the soil by the shavings. At least it does in my coop and garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

My back yard visitor. He likes yellow & green beans apparently.


Edited by Hokum Coco - 1/4/16 at 11:35am

Hope this helps,

Check out this link leads to a Video interview on me and my grand daughter done by a local TV Station on our WHITE HOMING PIGEON loft:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1478351/carrier-pigeons-continue-to-connect-family/

If you are not living for something;

You are dying for nothing.

Reply

Hope this helps,

Check out this link leads to a Video interview on me and my grand daughter done by a local TV Station on our WHITE HOMING PIGEON loft:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1478351/carrier-pigeons-continue-to-connect-family/

If you are not living for something;

You are dying for nothing.

Reply
post #7 of 7
I had trouble with straw also, I just started using pine shavings also
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