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Chickens in California - Page 3

post #21 of 23
If you really just want one breed the turkens seem ideal for you. Heat tolerant, good egg production and reasonable meat.

Kev is the expert on them.
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post #22 of 23

Someone commented in another thread about a group of French foodies sampling and rating poultry.  Bresse was rated number one.  Guess what was rated number 2? Naked neck.  Barbezieux completed the third spot.

 

You can cross.. but you can also line breed for meatier birds.  Or introduce naked neck into a breed/line of your choosing for better heat tolerance. Naked neck does make a big difference in heat tolerance, especially in the large heavy birds.

 

NN birds are much easier to pluck for sure...  and also part of their appeal is excellent crisping of the skin.

 

Fayoumi were bred for egg production with very low broodiness(practically none if I remember correctly), there are always exceptions to the rule such as some leghorns and polish going broody(I've had three polish go broody- one was truly excellent mother but the other two were horrible mothers) but it is best not to expect a non-broody breed to give you a broody hen or two.

 

I'll let pictures speak a few words:

 

 

 

post #23 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kev View Post

Someone commented in another thread about a group of French foodies sampling and rating poultry.  Bresse was rated number one.  Guess what was rated number 2? Naked neck.  Barbezieux completed the third spot.

You can cross.. but you can also line breed for meatier birds.  Or introduce naked neck into a breed/line of your choosing for better heat tolerance. Naked neck does make a big difference in heat tolerance, especially in the large heavy birds.

NN birds are much easier to pluck for sure...  and also part of their appeal is excellent crisping of the skin.

Fayoumi were bred for egg production with very low broodiness(practically none if I remember correctly), there are always exceptions to the rule such as some leghorns and polish going broody(I've had three polish go broody- one was truly excellent mother but the other two were horrible mothers) but it is best not to expect a non-broody breed to give you a broody hen or two.

I'll let pictures speak a few words:







Seriously can't believe I missed this post!!

Oh... I read that they went broody for an egg laying breed? Hurrumph! I'll definitely be incorporating some Naked Necks into my little program. smile.png I'm thinking about Australorps, Dorkings, Jersey Giants, Silkies (just cuz they're cute LOL), and some Naked Necks now... I want to see if the Dorking meat that they're prized to be is a dominant gene an see if it passes down to their offspring, which will be crosses. My plan right now is:

Dorkings - 3 hens and some extra roos to sample.
Australorps - 2 hens for eggs.
Naked Neck - 1 or 2 roosters, 3 hens. (genetic defeathering!)
Jersey Giant - 2 hens.
Silkies - 2 hens (for love)

I know that I'll be crossing the NN with the Jersey Giant no doubt, but I would like to pick out a rooster from the batch and then replace the NN rooster with the new cross. I don't quite know what I should do to the hens... Line breed? I don't know how to do that and don't want to risk serious deformities.
Edited by June2012 - 1/11/16 at 4:31pm
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