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Do chickens like laying on dog hair?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

So I posted this in another category cause I'm not sure which one it falls in but I'll put it here too:

 

So I have a golden retriever, and as you can imagine we groom him a lot of have a lot of fluffy long hair.  Would my chickens like laying on his fur in their run? Would it be ok for them if they ate some-or would it get wrapped around intestines?  Please let me know what you all think! 

The girls:

Easter Eggers-Coconut, Gold n' Plump, Stir Fry

Australorps-Curry, Minnie, Kung Poa, Blossom

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The girls:

Easter Eggers-Coconut, Gold n' Plump, Stir Fry

Australorps-Curry, Minnie, Kung Poa, Blossom

Reply
post #2 of 5

I dont' think it would hurt to put some out there, in the nest, and see what they do.  If thye toss it out, you know they don't want it

post #3 of 5

You'd be better off putting it in mesh bags around your garden to ward off rabbits.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #4 of 5
I find that most wild animals are really adaptable, deer, groundhog, rabbits, raccoons whatever. They pretty quickly figure out no dog is attached to that hair. It’s been effective for a while but not in the long term. I even found that true with coyote urine.

What’s been your experience Aart? It sounds really good in theory but I haven’t seen that work for more than a few days, even when I renew the hair..

A few years back I shot 16 rabbits in my garden before they stopped eating my beans as they sprouted. It’s not as if I haven’t tried a few things.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply
post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post

I find that most wild animals are really adaptable, deer, groundhog, rabbits, raccoons whatever. They pretty quickly figure out no dog is attached to that hair. It’s been effective for a while but not in the long term. I even found that true with coyote urine.

What’s been your experience Aart? It sounds really good in theory but I haven’t seen that work for more than a few days, even when I renew the hair..

A few years back I shot 16 rabbits in my garden before they stopped eating my beans as they sprouted. It’s not as if I haven’t tried a few things.

True, it's nominally effective, like most 'deterrents'. ...but a better place for it than a chicken run.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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