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-20 degree temps and getting colder

post #1 of 7
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I have 8 hens and the past week it Has been -20 or colder I am wondering what extras I should feed them and or how y'all take care of your chickens when it gets this cold?
post #2 of 7
It is getting cold here too, haven't reached the -20 yet, but I'm sure it will get here eventually. I don't do too much different than I do on warmer days, I need to replace the water more, I give mine a warm ration and oatmeal mixture, I throw out scratch to get them moving, put down grassy hay for them to pick through and get some more scratch in them before bedtime as well as a bit of warm water. They also will seek out any sunshine.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhenlikesdogs View Post

It is getting cold here too, haven't reached the -20 yet, but I'm sure it will get here eventually. I don't do too much different than I do on warmer days, I need to replace the water more, I give mine a warm ration and oatmeal mixture, I throw out scratch to get them moving, put down grassy hay for them to pick through and get some more scratch in them before bedtime as well as a bit of warm water. They also will seek out any sunshine.

 

This is exactly what a lot of us in the really cold climates do.  Great advice!!!

post #4 of 7

Scratch is more of an energy food, and that is what they need in cold weather. I feed more of that this time of year. In very bitter weather, I have given either corn meal or cornmeal bread. Gramma said to make them warm cornmeal mush, but it froze solid, and after that they didn't eat it.

 

Mrs K

Western South Dakota Rancher
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Western South Dakota Rancher
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post #5 of 7

-20F?

Windchill factor or air temp?

 

Dry bedding, liquid water always(I use a heated waterer), block wind, lots of ventilation with any drafts blocked.

Thin layer hay/straw on snow covered ground, shovel out part of run.

Good healthy birds from a balanced diet with sufficient protein.

Scratch grains thrown in run or coop(depending on weather) to balance high protein crumble.....and to keep them busy and observe mobility levels.


Edited by aart - 1/12/16 at 4:34am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 7

Suet is also a good high calorie energy source to stay warm.  


Edited by JanetMarie - 1/12/16 at 4:41am
...what you know for sure that just ain't so...--Mark Twain;  is what harms future generations.--me
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...what you know for sure that just ain't so...--Mark Twain;  is what harms future generations.--me
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post #7 of 7
I give boss and cracked corn to keep them generating heat for cold nights (single digits) my coop is wall and floor insulated (but lots of ventilation 9-10' up) though the pop door is always open to the run (have an ante wall) so wind/snow doesn't blow in. I've also installed safe wall panel heater, that I only use when it plummets to -20s-30s, (which we had last winter) my first winter with chicken to prevent frozen eggs and frozen waterer.

But what do I know I'm only into my 2nd winter of chicken raising, all I know I don't want frost bites, wasted frozen eggs other wise I'll contend with store bought eggs.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Basic starter: Personally designed & built Shed/Coupe/Run: 3 Leghorns, 2 Plymouth Barred Rocks, 5 Silver Laced Wyandottes

NEW ADDITION: 4/21/15
Rhode Island Reds, Plymouth Barred Rock
Black Copper Marans & Blue Marans
12x24x7 additional run


NEW BABIES: 2/17/16
New Hampshires, Black Australorps, Amerecaunas,
Easter Eggers & Black Sex Links

NEWER YET: 3/16/16
Spe...
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Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Basic starter: Personally designed & built Shed/Coupe/Run: 3 Leghorns, 2 Plymouth Barred Rocks, 5 Silver Laced Wyandottes

NEW ADDITION: 4/21/15
Rhode Island Reds, Plymouth Barred Rock
Black Copper Marans & Blue Marans
12x24x7 additional run


NEW BABIES: 2/17/16
New Hampshires, Black Australorps, Amerecaunas,
Easter Eggers & Black Sex Links

NEWER YET: 3/16/16
Spe...
Reply
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