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New home - how to move coops?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Moving to a nearby city, it's about 26 miles from my present home.  I have 2 coops, the first is a 4'x12' a friend built for me.  The second is a hoop coop built from 16' feed panels sold at Tractor Supply and elsewhere, a slightly modified version of the one shown here:  http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agc/pubs/ASC/ASC189/ASC189.pdf  .

 

I searched on moving a coop, but no relevant threads came up, only questions about moving a coop across a pasture, or on the same property, nothing similar to a 26 mile city to city move.

 

The 12x4 coop that a friend built was transported here via U-haul 12 trailer.  Don't want to do that again, their trailer is too narrow and at exactly 12 feet, it was a squeeze.  Hoping to find a 14' flat trailer to rent, I know Tractor Supply rents some flat trailers, but I'm not certain they go to that length.

 

The hoop coop remains a problem.  At about 8' x 8' or perhaps a half-foot larger on each side, it's too wide for any conventional trailer. 

 

Looking for ideas on moving both coops, anyone got any notions?  I'm moving to a Chattanooga, TN suburb, if it matters.

 

Thinking a backyard shed mover might be an answer, but don't find many in the area.  I know a guy who knows a guy who knows a guy who allows a purveyor of sheds to put a demonstration model on his parking lot, so I'll check into that with my fingers crossed.  The other notion I had was a roll back wrecker.  Local company here actually has pictures of them moving a shed that is a wee bit wider than my hoop coop. I'll talk to them, but the more avenues to pursue, the better.  I appreciate any thoughts you might have on this subject.

 

TIA

post #2 of 9

Might be cheaper to just build new coops at your new residence. 

post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keel View Post  I have 2 coops, the first is a 4'x12' a friend built for me.  The second is a hoop coop built from 16' feed panels sold at Tractor Supply

 

Looking for ideas on moving both coops, anyone got any notions?  

 

Maybe partially dismantling the coops might make the move more viable.

 

Something tells me you may have already consider this and it is not an option you want to persue.

 

The hoop coop if it has a ground floor as depicted in the photo It might be possible to placed the trailer inside the coop with the door taken off  or fastened out of the way to allow for the draw bar of the trailer.

 

 Then shore up and secure it to stop movement from inside the coop with cross members to allow the sides to clear the asphalt by what ever the tolerances allow.

 

The question then becomes wether to have the exterior frame above or below the draw bar through the door opening.

 

If the hoop coop has a floor remove enough floor boards to  allow the coop to drape over your trailer and wheels.

 

Make sure you do not use a rubber tape measure or a glass eye when you are measuring for tolerances if this proves to be an option.

 

TIA


Edited by Hokum Coco - 1/13/16 at 8:24pm

Hope this helps,

Check out this link leads to a Video interview on me and my grand daughter done by a local TV Station on our WHITE HOMING PIGEON loft:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1478351/carrier-pigeons-continue-to-connect-family/

If you are not living for something;

You are dying for nothing.

Reply

Hope this helps,

Check out this link leads to a Video interview on me and my grand daughter done by a local TV Station on our WHITE HOMING PIGEON loft:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1478351/carrier-pigeons-continue-to-connect-family/

If you are not living for something;

You are dying for nothing.

Reply
post #4 of 9

For the solid coop how about a tow truck??? I know some around here will move small structures once they have been proven to be solid.

I am not so sure on the hoop coop. Perhaps it would fit a tow truck bed or it may need taken apart if Hocum Coco's suggestions wont work.

post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by 21hens-incharge View Post
 

For the solid coop how about a tow truck??? I know some around here will move small structures once they have been proven to be solid.

I am not so sure on the hoop coop. Perhaps it would fit a tow truck bed or it may need taken apart if Hocum Coco's suggestions wont work.


This sounds like a good idea.

Remember to be aware of height clearances before you strike out especially at over pass and maybe expansion bridges.

Hope this helps,

Check out this link leads to a Video interview on me and my grand daughter done by a local TV Station on our WHITE HOMING PIGEON loft:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1478351/carrier-pigeons-continue-to-connect-family/

If you are not living for something;

You are dying for nothing.

Reply

Hope this helps,

Check out this link leads to a Video interview on me and my grand daughter done by a local TV Station on our WHITE HOMING PIGEON loft:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1478351/carrier-pigeons-continue-to-connect-family/

If you are not living for something;

You are dying for nothing.

Reply
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the responses.  Building new - buying a house depleted my funds for a bit.  Also, I imagine whoever buys my present home likely would not appreciate the coops in the backyard.  gotta do something with them, hate to destroy them.  Disassembly--this is a must on the 12x4.  First coop, did not have much understanding of what I needed, it was built with 3/4" plywood, so I'll take that part off, also the heavy roof with shingles, and then hopefully it will move better to allow it to get on a trailer if that's the route I go. 

 

A local pal suggested just putting the hoop coop on top of the rails of a trailer and securing it rock solid.  Having overhang on each side might make it seem less unwieldy, I dunno.  I still like the idea of a roll back wrecker, gonna talk to one nearby and explore the possibility and cost.

 

Always listening if anyone has more . . . . . thanks again for those submitted so far!

post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keel View Post.  First coop was built with 3/4" plywood,  also the heavy roof with shingles,
 

 

Always listening if anyone has more . . . . . thanks again for those submitted so far!

Wow no one uses 3/4" plywood too expensive. It must have a lot of integrity. I agree it would be a shame to destroy. Wishing you good fortune on what ever you decide Backyard buddy.


Edited by Hokum Coco - 1/16/16 at 9:24am

Hope this helps,

Check out this link leads to a Video interview on me and my grand daughter done by a local TV Station on our WHITE HOMING PIGEON loft:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1478351/carrier-pigeons-continue-to-connect-family/

If you are not living for something;

You are dying for nothing.

Reply

Hope this helps,

Check out this link leads to a Video interview on me and my grand daughter done by a local TV Station on our WHITE HOMING PIGEON loft:

http://globalnews.ca/news/1478351/carrier-pigeons-continue-to-connect-family/

If you are not living for something;

You are dying for nothing.

Reply
post #8 of 9

Can't you just disassemble the hoop coop? If it's screwed together it shouldn't be a big deal to unscrew it enough to be able to move it. That's one reason we went with hoop style breeding pens, cause we knew we'd be moving in the next year or so and they could easily come with us. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #9 of 9

Flat bed wrecker with winch sounds best to me too.

Could do the hoop coop across trailer rails and clamp/tie wood base down real good, remove tarp or drive really slow.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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