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New hens not laying - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
They've been on egg pellets for a while now. The nutritional protein is 16%. I have 24 hens and 2 roosters, the coop measures 8'x20' .
post #12 of 16

Layer feed is for actively laying birds only. If you have a flock with birds that aren't laying, for whatever reason, then you should not offer layer feed. 

The extra calcium in the layer feed will build up in the kidneys and eventually cause them to fail, killing the bird. They will not show any signs of illness until it is far too late.

A grower, all flock, or flock raiser type feed would be a better choice for your flock, with crushed oyster shell offered separately. The higher protein content may help your girls to finally start laying.

post #13 of 16

I would give them a mix of corn, laying pellets and grit

or a mix of corn, laying pellets, chick crumbs

or a mix of corn, laying pellets, chick crumbs and grit

or a mix of wild bird seed, laying pellets and grit

or a mix of wild bird seed, laying pellets, chick crumbs

or a mix of wild bird seed, laying pellets, chick crumbs and grit

give them some greens as well

and put apple cider vinger in there water

also they will not lay in winter so if you want them to lay put a lamp inside the hutch 

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

Layer feed is for actively laying birds only. If you have a flock with birds that aren't laying, for whatever reason, then you should not offer layer feed. 

The extra calcium in the layer feed will build up in the kidneys and eventually cause them to fail, killing the bird. They will not show any signs of illness until it is far too late.

A grower, all flock, or flock raiser type feed would be a better choice for your flock, with crushed oyster shell offered separately. The higher protein content may help your girls to finally start laying.

Good Advice^^^^^

 

 

I like to feed a 'flock raiser' 20% protein crumble to all ages and genders, as non-layers(chicks, males and molting birds) do not need the extra calcium that is in layer feed and chicks and molters can use the extra protein. Makes life much simpler to store and distribute one type of chow that everyone can eat. I do grind up the crumbles (in the blender) for the chicks for the first week or so.

 

The higher protein crumble also offsets the 8% protein scratch grains and other kitchen/garden scraps I like to offer. I adjust the amounts of other feeds to get the protein levels desired with varying situations.

 

Calcium should be available at all times for the layers, I use oyster shell mixed with rinsed, dried, crushed chicken egg shells in a separate container.

 

Animal protein (mealworms, a little cheese - beware the salt content, meat scraps) is provided during molting and if I see any feather eating.


Edited by aart - 1/15/16 at 6:26am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #15 of 16

Have you got oyster shell grit

post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Yes I do have oyster shells out to them.
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