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using energy saving light bulbs for incubator? - Page 2

post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 

thanks lazy I heard that 12 volt batteries work for incubators

post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 

i watched rush lanes vids and I don't know how to use a thermostat he does not make any sence or I just don't understand what does a thermostat do does it save energy or something/

post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickenshiha View Post

i watched rush lanes vids and I don't know how to use a thermostat he does not make any sence or I just don't understand what does a thermostat do does it save energy or something/

Thermo : heat
Stat : switch
If it gets too cold, a thermostat turns a heater on, when it gets warm enough, it turns off. Lots of builders like the Inkbird thermostat and it's relatively inexpensive and easy to figure out how to wire it up. I used an MK138 kit on my first build. It is very cheap but you need significant electronics capabilities to build and modify it. The Inkbird runs on 120vac, the MK138 on 6vdc (battery power)

If you want to use a battery, it needs to be a nice big car battery or you won't last 21 days unless you charge it. It this case, great insulation is your friend.
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 

how much would a car battery cost? when di I have to charge it?

post #15 of 21

a 6 egg incubator well insulated shouldn't require 60watts. A 40 egg incubator I built has 60watts of power available but uses probably 30 to 40 watts average during the incubation period.

 

so what's wattage.

 

 

watts is a simple calculation based on voltage x amp = watts

 

60 watt light bulb at 120v uses about 1/2 amp of power. A 60 watt 12v light bulb uses 5 amps of power.

 

  A battery has a amp/hour rating. Lets say a large deep cell has 50 amp/hour rating. That's equal to 1 amp for 50hrs which in a perfect world would be about 10 hours running a 60watt bulb.  As the light turns on and off you might be able to get 24hrs. But nothing in life is free so recharging the battery will require just as much (more in real life) power to recharge the battery thus the electric bill will be the same.

  A standard car battery is not deep cycle so after a few days of full discharge/ recharge it will probably quit and die.

 

So what do you have that's cheap and makes heat. Maybe kerosene, paraffin as these have been used for many years to heat incubators.

post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gpop1 View Post
 

a 6 egg incubator well insulated shouldn't require 60watts. A 40 egg incubator I built has 60watts of power available but uses probably 30 to 40 watts average during the incubation period.

 

so what's wattage.

 

 

watts is a simple calculation based on voltage x amp = watts

 

60 watt light bulb at 120v uses about 1/2 amp of power. A 60 watt 12v light bulb uses 5 amps of power.

 

  A battery has a amp/hour rating. Lets say a large deep cell has 50 amp/hour rating. That's equal to 1 amp for 50hrs which in a perfect world would be about 10 hours running a 60watt bulb.  As the light turns on and off you might be able to get 24hrs. But nothing in life is free so recharging the battery will require just as much (more in real life) power to recharge the battery thus the electric bill will be the same.

  A standard car battery is not deep cycle so after a few days of full discharge/ recharge it will probably quit and die.

 

So what do you have that's cheap and makes heat. Maybe kerosene, paraffin as these have been used for many years to heat incubators.

i am sorry idont understand what ur saying its like science what are paraffin and kerosene I think there lamp oils but whats do they do? and also would a 40watt bulb be good for at least 4-5 eggs at least 2-4 eggs and cheaper that way

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickenshiha View Post
 

i am sorry idont understand what ur saying its like science what are paraffin and kerosene I think there lamp oils but whats do they do? and also would a 40watt bulb be good for at least 4-5 eggs at least 2-4 eggs and cheaper that way

 

 

lamp oil can be used to heat a large incubator. There are designs on line that show how the old incubators were built before electricity was widely available. The hard part to find will be a spring that opens a vent flap to allow heat to escape when it gets above the set temp.

 

a small 4-6 egg incubator could be done using a 15 to 25 watt bulb depending on the material you have to build the incubator and the ambient air temperature of your home.

post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 

how do i use lamp oil? have you ever used it to hatch before? need more information lamp oil sounds interesting when talking about power save incubators!

post #19 of 21

do a search for kerosene incubator on the internet there thousands of results including how to build one.

post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 

thanks gpop1 have u ever done this before using this oil? if you have tell me how it went and is it the best when saving electricity

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