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Converted 10x50ft elevated shed

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Just converted a 10x50ft shed to chicken house. It's elevated about 2 1/2ft above ground level for my flock of 32 assorted bantams. When I moved here the chickens were housed in a small closet type building attached to the side of the shed that now is the new chicken house. I have ramps going from inside the old inclosure to the new one for the chickens to be able to get inside. There are 2 24 inch square holes for them to make their way from the old house to the new one. There is approx. twelve to 15 nesting boxes that stand about knee level along with 4 perches that run from wall to wall. only 2 windows. One in the walk in door and one at the other end of the building. Kind of dark in there. anyway I have noticed them going in and out, going in to eat out of the feed troughs etc. But not really spending time in there as far as nesting, and I thought they had stopped laying eggs until yesterday when I noticed eggs under some bushes in my yard. No eggs in the old nesting boxes or new nesting boxes. Just out in the yard. Any ideas why that is happening? I used cedar shavings  along with hay in the new boxes and on the floor in the new chicken house. Wondering if that may have something to do with the strange behavior?

post #2 of 4

I read about NOT USING CEDAR SHAVINGS  .. You may investigate that one some more..    In my preference, I would use only hay or straw..  Your new chicken coop is also dark and that may also be a factor.   Install more windows for natural light.  It is also very large for the quantity of  banties you have.  You can easily house 100+ standard chickens there.  Maybe section it off so they feel more gregarious with closer  proximity.    When your numbers expand, then expand facility volume.

WISHING YOU BEST. and :welcome 

 

post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 

Thank you so much for your reply and great info. I did some research since reading your message and found out that the cedar is NOT GOOD for chickens. Especially young chicks. So I'm getting rid of that stuff in the chicken house. Also going to put in a few windows for more light. I think I'm going to put up a tempoary wall that I can move around to keep them more confined to about half of the total space. Then move it as the flock grows. Thanks again for helping me out. Nice to be a member here for sure!

Your friend in Oklahoma,

Joe,  City Boy

post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Boy View Post
 

Thank you so much for your reply and great info. I did some research since reading your message and found out that the cedar is NOT GOOD for chickens. Especially young chicks. So I'm getting rid of that stuff in the chicken house. Also going to put in a few windows for more light. I think I'm going to put up a temporary wall that I can move around to keep them more confined to about half of the total space. Then move it as the flock grows. Thanks again for helping me out. Nice to be a member here for sure!

Your friend in Oklahoma,

Joe,  City Boy

Best thing I did...couple of 2x2's with chicken wire attached(go all the way to the ceiling) can put it up and take it down with 4 screws into coop walls in about 5 minutes, roll it up to store. BUT, I have 2 people doors into coop, one for access to area partitioned off with temp wall.

 

Got pics of this building?

Plans for storage areas and laying out separate sections of coop?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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