New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Fowl Pox?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
This is going to sound like a broken record to some, but very new and troubling to me and my family. We all love our birds and consider them an extension of our family. Essentially, within the past week I have noticed what looks to be the dry version of fowl pox on my welsummer, and as recent as today have noticed the beginnings of the infection on my other birds combs and waddles. Ive been reading about the virus and realize there is no treatment, but i wonder if it's too late to administer the vaccine? Someone please inform me what I can do to save my birds. For now, they seem to be happy, eating well, drinking and each layING an egg/day. I have 5 hens all together and see signs on each. The welsummer is the worst and most resemble signs comparable to the bared rock (minor). Scratch is available all day (17% protein, 2.5 fat and 7.5 fiber.... essentially mule city backyard layer), but they are free range birds and eat plenty bugs and worms. Any advice would be sincerely appreciated! !!

post #2 of 7

Yes that is dry fowl pox, a virus spread by mosquitoes that lasts a couple of weeks. There is no treatment, but you can put iodine on the scabs to help them dry out. Any lesions near the eyes can cause secondary bacterial infections, so if you see any, put some Terramycin eye ointment or  Vetericyn eye gel into the eyes. Make sure they are eating and drinking well. Wet pox which causes yellow lesions inside the beak and throat can be serious, but dry pox is usually not as bad.

post #3 of 7
Originally Posted by 1luckyfisherman View Post

This is going to sound like a broken record to some, but very new and troubling to me and my family. We all love our birds and consider them an extension of our family. Essentially, within the past week I have noticed what looks to be the dry version of fowl pox on my welsummer, and as recent as today have noticed the beginnings of the infection on my other birds combs and waddles. Ive been reading about the virus and realize there is no treatment, but i wonder if it's too late to administer the vaccine? Someone please inform me what I can do to save my birds. For now, they seem to be happy, eating well, drinking and each layING an egg/day. I have 5 hens all together and see signs on each. The welsummer is the worst and most resemble signs comparable to the bared rock (minor). Scratch is available all day (17% protein, 2.5 fat and 7.5 fiber.... essentially mule city backyard layer), but they are free range birds and eat plenty bugs and worms. Any advice would be sincerely appreciated! !!

 

Dry Fowl Pox generally will clear up on its own in 2-3 weeks. As long as they are eating and drinking and don't have symptom of WET Pox, then they should be fine.  Once they make a recovery they will be immune according to the links below.

 

http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/63/fowl-pox-pox-avian-pox/

 

http://www.hobbyfarms.com/livestock-and-pets/fowl-pox-in-chickens.aspx


Edited by Wyorp Rock - 1/23/16 at 7:57pm
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

Is it too late to vaccinate these birds since it is now evident all have the virus? I dont want to make their condition worse....

 

Thank you!

post #5 of 7

According to the link I provided you, they would have to be vaccinated "well before production", which I would read as being vaccinated when they are small chicks.

http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/63/fowl-pox-pox-avian-pox/

 

   Quote:

Originally Posted by Eggcessive View Post
 

Yes that is dry fowl pox, a virus spread by mosquitoes that lasts a couple of weeks. There is no treatment, but you can put iodine on the scabs to help them dry out. Any lesions near the eyes can cause secondary bacterial infections, so if you see any, put some Terramycin eye ointment or  Vetericyn eye gel into the eyes. Make sure they are eating and drinking well. Wet pox which causes yellow lesions inside the beak and throat can be serious, but dry pox is usually not as bad.

As @Eggcessive stated, it lasts a couple of weeks.

 

You will really just have to let it run it's course, it should resolve in a couple of weeks.

post #6 of 7
As a note, the scabs that fall off of the pox are highly contagious; they can be contagious to new birds up to a year. As a safeguard, vaccinate all new birds on your property at 6-10 weeks old. Make sure to administer the vaccine in the correct amount, and that your birds are in top condition, because the live virus vaccine can cause the disease in weakened animals. 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eggcessive View Post
 

Yes that is dry fowl pox, a virus spread by mosquitoes that lasts a couple of weeks. There is no treatment, but you can put iodine on the scabs to help them dry out. Any lesions near the eyes can cause secondary bacterial infections, so if you see any, put some Terramycin eye ointment or  Vetericyn eye gel into the eyes. Make sure they are eating and drinking well. Wet pox which causes yellow lesions inside the beak and throat can be serious, but dry pox is usually not as bad.

x2


Edited by beetandsteet - 1/25/16 at 1:18pm

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088873/styrofoam-incubators-club ---Come join us! 

~Below Paradise Poultry~

 

Reply

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088873/styrofoam-incubators-club ---Come join us! 

~Below Paradise Poultry~

 

Reply
post #7 of 7


Your answer was the most reassuring one I've read. Thank you!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home