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Counting Sheep...Gonna Wanna Sleep...Bedroom by Moi Critters?? - Page 3

post #21 of 22
Yep that soap recipe is simple- that is how I generally make I the same way but with different oils. I don't like that it doesn't tell you how much extra oil is in the bar- so you don't know how harsh or gentle it will be. I don't usually use lard since lard make a very hard bar that doesn't lather great, plus I don't use much lard around the house. If you have other oils/fats you can use a soap calculator that will tell you how much lye and water you need for the amount of oils/fats.

Sheep don't shrink in the rain because wool needs heat and friction (or basic compound like soap) to felt and shrink....

I wonder how many fleeces it would take to make a mattress? I have a lot less sheep than you- I only have four at the moment- and the ewe lamb's fleece may be worth more to sell for spinning....

Homesteading on a 6 acre hobby farm in Southern Wisconsin. Raising a gifted child, A barnyard mix of chickens, Icelandic sheep, A sweet elderly pitty bull, a few barn cats, and a large garden.  

 

 

History Geek- Medieval reenactment, fiber arts and cooking, and natural architectural nut.

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Homesteading on a 6 acre hobby farm in Southern Wisconsin. Raising a gifted child, A barnyard mix of chickens, Icelandic sheep, A sweet elderly pitty bull, a few barn cats, and a large garden.  

 

 

History Geek- Medieval reenactment, fiber arts and cooking, and natural architectural nut.

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post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 

Heel low:

 

 

Here's a few soap calculators...

 

http://www.brambleberry.com/Pages/Lye-Calculator.aspx

 

http://soapcalc.net/

 

http://howtomakesoap.org/soap-calculator/

 

No idea if these are good ones!  :hu

 

I am just blown away there are so many...hee hee...wonders never cease!

 

 

I was kidding about sheep shrinking in the rain...but always fun to get a scientific type reply back.  :ya

 

I hold dear to the equation; heat + moisture + movement = felting

 

 

 

How many pounds of fibre for a wool mattess...I suppose it depends on the size of the mattress you wanted.  :P

 

 

The wool comforter that CWM makes is like five pounds of fibre which is roughly what some breeds of sheep produce.  That's the topper, not the bottomer and the mattress is suppose to support you...so I guess how firm do you want it would equal how much fibre you stuffed in it.  I like firm...very firm...I am gonna be a hearty stuffer, eh!  :lau 

 

http://www.customwoolenmills.com/wool_shop/cold_country_wool_bedding/cold_country_comforter_king_size:
 The king size Cold Country Comforter is filled with 5lbs of 100% pure new wool and covered with 100% cotton. It measures approximately 228cm x 274cm, 108inches x 90inches.

 

 

My Jacobs are in the Great White North...so they produce a longer staple than Jacobs that reside in the more Southern areas.  LOL  Jacobs are not a huge sheep breed either.

 

I did a quick weigh of an unskirted fleece and mine vary from seven pounds to ten pounds.  Skirting would change the weight to less of course as will washing the raw fleeces.

 

 

 

How clean your fleeces matters too...how much veg MATTER, eh.  You would be wanting to know how many pounds of fibre, useable wool you could expect per sheep. 

 

Alberta Lamb site has some good info...

 

http://www.ablamb.ca/images/documents/factsheets/Wool-Quality.pdf:
 Winter Feeding Winter feeding is the number one cause of wool contamination. There are many different methods for feeding sheep in the winter and with each method there are varying degrees of wool contamination. Though it is not practical to base feeding methods on clean wool production alone, it does help to keep it in mind when deciding which method works best for your operation.
 
Give sheep space. Sheep have a tendency to have a look around while they are chewing a mouthful of feed and all the while dropping little bits of hay which more often than not end up on their neighbour’s back. Provide feed at ground level when ever possible. Setting out whole round bales with or without bale feeders is probably the worst method of feeding in terms of wool contamination. The contamination is due to the close proximity of the sheep while they are pulling down mouthfuls of feed from the bale with some of it again ending up on the backs of those next to them. Instead, consider rolling the bales out to give sheep more room with their feed at ground level. When possible, feed just what can be consumed by the sheep in a day to avoid feed contamination and waste.
 
Lock sheep out of the feed area while feeding. When feeding with a pitch fork and it isn’t possible to lock sheep out while feeding avoid throwing feed on their backs. A bale processor always creates a cloud of fine hay particles which creates dusty fleeces if the sheep are near when processing hay.
 
Provide a clean, dry area for sheep to bed down to avoid wool contamination from the manure buildup during the winter and mud in the spring.

 

 

What I do know, I have hundreds of pounds of raw fibre...and I expect a king size mattress with a five or so inch depth to take hundreds of pounds to produce.

 

The one lady that allowed me to contribute her experiences says the child's mattress was heavy...two inches thick and heavy for its size.

 

 

I would ponder the value of a lamb's fleece for spinning compared to wool needed for your mattress...I bin keeping tabs and the most expensive one I've seen is ten thousand dollars over in Jolly Ol' England...the lamb's fleece would have to fetch a pretty penny for me to part with any of my own wool at the moment (once the mattresses I want is completed, I am going to want to keep wool on hand for future RE-stuffing, eh.  I use to get about $100 a fleece...no comparison to what stuffing my own mattress is going to save me by using my own fibre.  

 

 

More rah rah about wool!  :woot

 

http://www.customwoolenmills.com/wool_shop/cold_country_wool_bedding:

In our estimation, there is no finer material, either synthetic or natural, for bedding products than wool. The Cold Country 100% Wool Fill Bedding products, made right here at the mill, are our offering to you in sleep luxury.

 

Why is Wool so Good as Bedding?

Wool has excellent insulating properties that will keep you warm in the winter and cool in the summer, elliminating the need for multiple sets of bedding in our Canadian climate. This is also great for couples with different sleep temperature preferences as the wool moderates these differences, leaving both partners comfortable.

 

Unlike synthetic and down-feather products, wool can absorb up to 30% of its weight in water without feeling damp, making it comfortable to sleep under for all users even in extremely humid conditions. This is excellent for users who sweat a lot during the night or who are living in humid climates. Our comforters are covered in light and breathable 100% Cotton and we recommend using a 100% Cotton duvet cover and sheets with them. The cotton absorbes any moisture from the surface of your skin and then the wool wicks it away from your body so it can be released to the air, ensuring you a dry and comfortable sleep all through the night.

 

Wool has the unique quality of being fire, water, static and wear resistant, giving it exception durability and providing the highest level of safety to its user.

 

Wool is a renewable, reusable and biodegradable product. After years of use, you can send your wool comforter back to have the wool re-processed and quilted in new fabric at a discounted price. Visit our blog for more information on the Canadian Wool We Use and How it is Farmed.

 

At Custom Woolen Mills, we do minimal processing of the wool, leaving out common industry processes such as bleaching, carbonizing, chlorinating, bonding with resin or glue, and moth proofing. These processes are hard on the environment, have unknown longterm consequences to human health, weaken the wool fiber and reduce the effectiveness of wool's natural qualities. Instead, at Custom Woolen Mills, we wash the raw wool with a mild, plant-based, biodegradable detergent, and then rinse with water - nothing more, nothing less.

 

Filled with 100% pure new Canadian wool and covered with light and breathable 100% cotton, the Cold Country Comforters, Mattress Pads, and Pillows are the all-natural answer to sleep comfort. You can take the superior qualities of wool with you in the Cold Country Sleeping Bags.

 

Doggone & Chicken UP!

 

Tara Lee Higgins

Higgins Rat Ranch Conservation Farm, Alberta, Canada

   /)____    WF:  DUCKS Call, East Indie, Mandarin, Crested, Aus Spot & Appleyard SWAN Australian Black RUDDY Shel

<~_____)          GEESE Buff, Buff Tufted, & Buff Pied American

    ``  `` )  LF:   BANTAM Brahma Wyandotte Booted Chantecler  STANDARD Chantecler   PHEASANT  Heritage TURKEY

             (           Reg'd Australian Cattle Dogs SHEEP Dorper & Jacob 

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   /)____    WF:  DUCKS Call, East Indie, Mandarin, Crested, Aus Spot & Appleyard SWAN Australian Black RUDDY Shel

<~_____)          GEESE Buff, Buff Tufted, & Buff Pied American

    ``  `` )  LF:   BANTAM Brahma Wyandotte Booted Chantecler  STANDARD Chantecler   PHEASANT  Heritage TURKEY

             (           Reg'd Australian Cattle Dogs SHEEP Dorper & Jacob 

Reply
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