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post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3riverschick View Post
 

Hi John,

 Do the partridge chicks down always come out with this gobbledygook head/neck marbling or are they to have a distinct pattern to the down on the head and neck? Also, have the Partridge breeders decided yet if they are going to use e+ or eb for the allele?

 Curious,

 Thanks,

 Karen

This has been a topic of discussion I've started on other sites over the past few years as I try to find out what day-old chick phenotype we should shoot for.  I believe for consistent adult phenotype there should be a day-old one that produces it.  The spotted foreheads are more prevalent for me, but I get some with a more solid brown forehead.  I haven't been able yet to determine which is more correct.  Partridge chicks in the YouTube videos I've seen, put out by commercial hatcheries, have the brown foreheads and assume that is what to look for...but my chicks with spotted foreheads mature into some of my best partridge colored/pattered birds.

I believe partridge are based on eb.

John W Blehm  Creator of several varieties of Ameraucana chickens.

Join the Ameraucana Alliance.  Membership starts at just $10/year. 

http://Ameraucana.org  -  http://AmeraucanaAlliance.org  -  http://Ameraucana.club

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John W Blehm  Creator of several varieties of Ameraucana chickens.

Join the Ameraucana Alliance.  Membership starts at just $10/year. 

http://Ameraucana.org  -  http://AmeraucanaAlliance.org  -  http://Ameraucana.club

Reply
post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by FowlStuff View Post
 

This has been a topic of discussion I've started on other sites over the past few years as I try to find out what day-old chick phenotype we should shoot for.  I believe for consistent adult phenotype there should be a day-old one that produces it.  The spotted foreheads are more prevalent for me, but I get some with a more solid brown forehead.  I haven't been able yet to determine which is more correct.  Partridge chicks in the YouTube videos I've seen, put out by commercial hatcheries, have the brown foreheads and assume that is what to look for...but my chicks with spotted foreheads mature into some of my best partridge colored/pattered birds.

I believe partridge are based on eb.

Thanks, John. That's what I was wondering. Does seems to be there should be a definitive chick down if there is to be a definitive genotype.

 BTW, can you help with the average weight of a bantam White Chantecler egg?

 Thanks!

 Karen

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3riverschick View Post
 

Thanks, John. That's what I was wondering. Does seems to be there should be a definitive chick down if there is to be a definitive genotype.

 BTW, can you help with the average weight of a bantam White Chantecler egg?

 Thanks!

 Karen

Mike would be the one to ask about bantams and their eggs.

John W Blehm  Creator of several varieties of Ameraucana chickens.

Join the Ameraucana Alliance.  Membership starts at just $10/year. 

http://Ameraucana.org  -  http://AmeraucanaAlliance.org  -  http://Ameraucana.club

Reply

John W Blehm  Creator of several varieties of Ameraucana chickens.

Join the Ameraucana Alliance.  Membership starts at just $10/year. 

http://Ameraucana.org  -  http://AmeraucanaAlliance.org  -  http://Ameraucana.club

Reply
post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sumi View Post

The
Chantecler is a dual purpose Canadian breed that was developed starting around 1908 by Brother Wilfred Chatelain, in the agricultural school associated with, Cistercian Abbey in Oka, Quebec. He set out to create a tough and hardy breed that was well suited to the harsh Canadian winters, as well as being a good layer and good meat bird.  The breed was introduced to the public in 1918, and became a useful breed for very cold climates. The Chantecler is notable for having a very small cushion comb and almost no wattles, making it very resistant to frostbite.  Its temperament is generally calm and quiet, though young birds can be flighty.  They are generally very good foragers.  The hens are excellent winter layers of large brown eggs, do go broody fairly often and make good mothers.  They are considered an excellent table bird.




The Chantecler is one of only two chicken breeds developed in Canada. The name Chantecler was created from the combination of the French ‘chanter,’ “to sing,” and ‘clair,’ “bright”. The original Chantecler developed by Brother Chatelain was a White bird, later Dr. J. E. Wilkinson of Alberta, Canada developed the Partridge color for a bird more suitable for keeping free range.  Buff and Red among other colors have also been developed. Breeds were used in the creation of the Chantecler, including Dark Cornish, Cochins, Leghorns, Plymouth Rocks, Rhode Island Reds and Wyandottes.  




Commercial breeds replaced the Chantecler over time, and by 1979 the Chantecler was no longer found in the university or commercial hatcheries and in danger of extinction.  A number of small flocks persisted, and it has regained popularity in the last ten years or so, and can again be found available in a number of commercial hatcheries.   




It was recognized by the APA in 1921 and
is on The Livestock Conservancy's Critical list.




Details:



 



Breed purpose: Duel Purpose, Meat Bird.



Comb Type: Small Cushion comb



Broodiness: Frequent, good mothers.



Climate Tolerance: Good, very cold hardy.



Weight: Rooster 8.5 lbs, Hen 6.5 lbs.



Egg Productivity: Fair-Good, very good winter layer.



Egg Size: Large



Egg Color: Brown





CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 75

Pic by @TimG
 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 75

Pic by @TimG
 



Pic by @Mac22
 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 75

Pic by @chickenbike
 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 75

Pic by @chickenbike
 

 

BYC Breed reviews:



 



http://www.backyardchickens.com/products/chantecler




General breed discussions & FAQ thread:



 



http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/243277/chantecler-thread/0_20

 

Do you own Chanteclers? Are you a Chantecler breeder? If so, please reply to this thread with the your thoughts and experiences, including:



 



·         What made you decide to get this breed?



·         Do you own them for fun? Breeding? Some other purpose?



·         What are your favorite characteristics about this breed?



·         Post some pics of your birds; male/female, chicks, eggs, etc!





I am starting a smaller flock of 24 pullets and 3M roasters.

The pullets will be from Virden MB, and the roosters will be from Lacombe AB. In the hatching eggs, any roosters from Virden will be sold to other breeders, after a hard cull.

Any pullets from Lacombe will start a 2nd flock with rooster from somewhere else.

I wanted the Partridge Chanteclers for their hardiness and colour. Free ranged birds get targeted by predators. Camouflage is very important.

Eventually, I want to get a few each of the Buff and Red, as well.

Their temperament is excellent and they are very easy to work with. It is my breed of choice.
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