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Smooth Silkies - Page 2

post #11 of 16

Think of recessive as "being PURE for the GENE" to show it.

 

Therefore all silky feathered birds are pure for the recessive silky feathering.

 

Your bird, having normal feathers is not "pure" for the silky feathering gene.  This is the reason for answers above saying they are not pure, and they are correct.  You got the eggs from someone... how do you know for sure a smooth bird was not a parent?

 

For example.. if you cross a silkie with a cochin,  you get birds feathered like a cochin(but it can look or feel a little softer).  That is because the cochin does not have the silky feather gene.. the cross babies carry the silky feather gene but since they are not 'pure' for it, they cannot have the silky feathers.

 

Now if you breed the silkie-cochin cross birds to a silkie, you will get half smooth feather and half silky feather.    That is what you are seeing with your birds.   As long as you breed a smooth, you will continue to get some smooth, some silky.   Only when you breed silky to silky, there will be 100% silky babies.

 

As for to keep or cull, that is completely up to you.  if you like it, that's all the reason you need to continue breeding them.   If you don't like it then that is also a perfectly valid reason to cull. 


Edited by Kev - 2/6/16 at 12:53pm
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by learycow View Post  Similar to how its best to breed a frizzle and a smooth rather than 2 frizzles... etc

There is a valid reason to only breed frizzles to a normal feathered bird. Breeding frizzle to frizzle can result in a frazzle, a chick with 2 copies of the frizzle gene. Not a pretty sight. It can cause extremely brittle feathering, resulting in some very naked birds.

 

 

this photo shows a frizzle on the right, a naked frazzle in the middle ...

 

 

As for your smooth silkies, I agree with Kev. If they do not have silkied feathers then they cannot be pure silkies.

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thank you Kev. Great explanation!

 

keesmom- thanks for the pictures. I had read that about the frizzles but never actually seen one! Those birds certainly wouldn't do well here in Maine, haha.

So is this only if breeding 2 frizzled birds? Or does the gene work the same way if you breed a frizzle with a smooth carrying frizzle as well?

 

I only have a frizzled rooster, no hens. But some of the babies I am raising could be fathered by him.

NPIP CERTIFIED! Al's Quackery is a small waterfowl farm in Southern Maine. I raise ducks, ducklings, geese, goslings and sell hatching eggs.
Ducks: Anconas (Black, Blue, Chocolate, Lavender, Lilac and Silver),  Muscovy (barred in black, blue, chocolate and combo, ripples in dark, chocolate, and blue shades, lavenders, and looneys in blue, black, chocolate and lilac)

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NPIP CERTIFIED! Al's Quackery is a small waterfowl farm in Southern Maine. I raise ducks, ducklings, geese, goslings and sell hatching eggs.
Ducks: Anconas (Black, Blue, Chocolate, Lavender, Lilac and Silver),  Muscovy (barred in black, blue, chocolate and combo, ripples in dark, chocolate, and blue shades, lavenders, and looneys in blue, black, chocolate and lilac)

Call Ducks: pied / magpie...

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post #14 of 16

Glad to help. :)

 

Frizzle is a dominant* gene,  if the bird has the gene "in any capacity/form" it very plainly shows the frizzled feathers.   A smooth feather is totally absent of the frizzle gene, even if it came from two frizzled parents. In this sense, there are no frizzled carriers..  only frizzles vs non-frizzles.

 

*it is actually a semi dominant, because there is a visible difference between a bird with one dose of frizzle vs. a bird with two dose of frizzle.   Basically a dose effect.. like one drop of red dye in cookie batter, you end up with pink cookies..  use two drops, you get red cookies.

 

There are some who do believe that using a smooth from a frizzle breeding helps make better 'frizzles' but that's due to separate genes unrelated to the frizzle gene but so happens to help with the feather curling.

 

Lastly....  this is where it can get confusing...  there is a separate gene that represses the effects of frizzling.  If a frizzle gets this gene, they are almost barely noticeable as being frizzled, there is only a very slight curling to tip of their feathers.

 

Just trying to cover all the bases because all too often there will be someone who likes to pipe in with the "exceptions" and seemingly complicate where a simple, straightforward answer would have largely sufficed for 'now'...


Edited by Kev - 2/7/16 at 4:58pm
post #15 of 16

Most likely your eggs came from someone working on a sizzle project.  I agree that it is not correct to call them silkies since they do not have silkie feathering.

Breeder & Exhibitor of fine silkies in recognized and project varieties.
adult and started pairs occasionally available;
   No eggs or chicks. 
Support your local poultry clubs, breed clubs, ABA & APA!

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Breeder & Exhibitor of fine silkies in recognized and project varieties.
adult and started pairs occasionally available;
   No eggs or chicks. 
Support your local poultry clubs, breed clubs, ABA & APA!

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post #16 of 16

Very pretty bird, nonetheless. :)

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Feather Tree Farm

Bearded BBS and Buff Silkies - Barred Plymouth Rocks - Wheaten Ameraucana's - Coturnix Quail

 

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