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Mold Problems

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
It has been rainy and wet here and there is no sign of the weather clearing up anytime soon for me to dry anything out. I noticed today that on the roof of my chicken coop black mold is starting to grow on the plywood that was used. I did fail to stain it with water resistent primar when it was built and the weather was nice. It slipped my mind!! I am wondering what I can do at this point? What I should do about it when the weather does clear up and how bad is this for the chickens in there. One good thing is that the mold is growing on the roof of the run so it is not in the enclosed part of the coop where they sleep....

This leads me to another question... I noticed now that it is winter time and rainy/wet outside if I do not clean up the poop in the inclosed part of the coop more frequently white fuzzy mold will grow on the poop. Would a heat lamp help in there to reduce that mold from growing and from it growing anywhere else in the enclosed part?

TIA!!!!
Edited by new2chicks3 - 2/2/16 at 3:43pm
post #2 of 4

It would seem that you need more ventilation the reason mold typically grows is a moist environment, a heat lamp may or may not help but the best way to get around it is just try to clean it more if possible, but to kill it now you can use bleach or vinegar sprayed directly on the mold.

post #3 of 4
Are these pics of your coop?
www.backyardchickens.com/t/1000995/breed-and-sex#post_15540300

If so, I think I see where the untreated plywood roof of the run is giving you problems. It isn't a ventilation issue (unless you have wrapped your run for winter or something) it looks like it's just an untreated and wet wood in a rainy environment issue. I'd put a tarp over it to keep the rain off it and prevent water from soaking into the wood. If you could erect a shelter so the tarp doesn't sit directly on the run roof then that would be even better because it would allow air circulation and the wood would dry faster.

As soon as the wood dried out I'd treat it with a mildicide and paint it with a good exterior paint. KilZ brand makes a good one. Then I'd install some roofing material. Maybe shingles to match the prefab coop you've got? Or poly or metal roof panels. You'll need to address the area where your rooflines meet. That will be a problem spot as rain will infiltrate the seam between the original run and your extension. If you could tie the two roofs together with flashing perhaps or maybe just one continuous roof over the whole thing then you'd eliminate any place that water could seep in.
post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by TalkALittle View Post

Are these pics of your coop?
www.backyardchickens.com/t/1000995/breed-and-sex#post_15540300

If so, I think I see where the untreated plywood roof of the run is giving you problems. It isn't a ventilation issue (unless you have wrapped your run for winter or something) it looks like it's just an untreated and wet wood in a rainy environment issue. I'd put a tarp over it to keep the rain off it and prevent water from soaking into the wood. If you could erect a shelter so the tarp doesn't sit directly on the run roof then that would be even better because it would allow air circulation and the wood would dry faster.

As soon as the wood dried out I'd treat it with a mildicide and paint it with a good exterior paint. KilZ brand makes a good one. Then I'd install some roofing material. Maybe shingles to match the prefab coop you've got? Or poly or metal roof panels. You'll need to address the area where your rooflines meet. That will be a problem spot as rain will infiltrate the seam between the original run and your extension. If you could tie the two roofs together with flashing perhaps or maybe just one continuous roof over the whole thing then you'd eliminate any place that water could seep in.

Good advice....and maybe make sure no water is getting in near the roof hinges.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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