BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying › Rooster Aggressive Towards One Hen
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Rooster Aggressive Towards One Hen - Page 2

post #11 of 17
I think we'll try those blinders that you clip onto the beak as a last chance, but I don't have a lot of hope. We need a chicken psychologist!

Jason (and Halo)

post #12 of 17

Sometimes the cock or all the birds will target one bird.

There may be something wrong with the targeted bird,

weak and/or sick birds can draw predators

so the flock removes or drives off that bird to lessen the threat to the flock.

 

Or maybe target bird is not submitting to cock....or there could be no reason.

 

I have had that happen in my flock, cock took a disliking to one bird in particular and would chase her down and sometimes pin her for a good pecking. Not sure why.

I have enough room and places of refuge that it wasn't real problem, target bird could get away,

hung out and roosted with the pullets. Eventually it stopped.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #13 of 17
Just curious how long "eventually" was. Thanks for posting!

Jason
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonVideo View Post

Just curious how long "eventually" was. Thanks for posting!

Jason

I don't really remember, several weeks or more.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #15 of 17

The saga continues.  The rooster still has a "thing" for the hen.  She stays away from him as best she can, but he goes after her when he can too. I have started a behavioral modification program.  I have a 5x7 chain link kennel.  I sit in there with the two of them.  When he starts to go after her I put a treat in front of him and he stops for the treat (bananas are his fave).  So they both get a treat.  The hope is that this will cause a "happy" feeling when they're near each other and the fighting will stop.  She finished molting and grew all of her feathers back in and looks great.  Just nervous as hell.  Poor baby.

 

Other than that, is there such thing as a proximity device for animals?  Say one animal gets a certain distance from the second animal and an alarm sounds or a vibration or mild shock?  Wouldn't that be a cool gadget to have?

 

Thanks,

 

Jason

post #16 of 17

...following this with LOADS of interest

 

I have 40 birds with 4 roosters: one 2 years old and the 3 others under 10 months . 2 were introduced when a change of coop occured in November and the old guy was VERY good to them...the youngest is a bird that was raised by a broody hen amoingst the flock last fall.

 

All is ...I guess I can say good. But I am seeing signs I might run into troubles.

 

** Did anyone ever noticed Ameraucana roosters to be a little more ''edgy'' than other breeds ?  I kept the last one but had to get rid of the 3 first as they were going BONKERS when they would reach 6-7 months, My main boy is a pure Wellsummer; super friendly and gentle with hens ....feeds chicks....etc  The 2 that were introduced in November are Barnevelders, so they are similar to Wellsummer.  So far so good but I find the Ameraucana seems to ''charge-mount'' the hens continuously...no courtship :(   Its hard to ''stay calm'' when you see him walk around like a predator just looking for an opportunity to sneak behind a good hen and start ''raping'' her.   ** Is it bad to get them off a hen when they do that?  The 3 other Ameraucanas were the same...no  courtship, no gentleness....just acting like ___holes as soon as they reached 6 months.

 

 

Hopefully the young Ameraucana turns allright and calms down.  


Edited by Acadian Birder - 3/14/17 at 2:35pm
post #17 of 17

Our Dominique is the best rooster otherwise.  Asks to be picked up, likes to be held.  Lets me Dr. his bumblefoot, just lays there for me.  Just an ___hole with that ONE hen.  Just about wrung his neck the other day!

 

We have 3 Ameraucana babies right now.  6 weeks old.  Hoping they're girls, but we have our doubts.  I sure hope if one IS a boy we can keep him to breed with the Marans and maybe get some Olive Eggers.  I haven't looked into their temperament.  We did have one a year ago and he turned out to be pretty skittish.  We gave him away to a breeder but he died due to an eye problem of some sort.

 

Guess I'll go do some banana training!

 

Jason

 

Here's a photo of Halo "guarding" the new Ameraucana babies.  He's such a good boy 99% of the time!

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying › Rooster Aggressive Towards One Hen