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Rooster nearly 1-year-old, not mating yet - Page 2

post #11 of 14
Hi Flock Leader, my names Brandi, and I'm new. I understand your situation completely I have a Black Jersey Giant Rooster. He doesn't mate either, he does this goofy shuffle around hens but that's it lol. .I know he's about 10 or 11 months old, his waddles are bright bright red. When I had my hens in which I don't have anymore I actually gave them to my mother-in-law and father-in-law, because I figured he wasn't breeding due to not being with his own kind!! What my mother-in-law told me was shocking to me she said in the flock I gave her
there were more roosters than hens. It was especially odd because I had bought these chickens from a private breeder who claimed them all to be pullets. So I realized then, that's why he probably wasn't interested in mating. So I ordered some chicks from Stromberg's asked for pullets and they're going to be Black Jersey Giants, I ordered 5 chicks along with 6 Light Brahmas and one is a cockrel, and I also have 5 Salmon Faverolles along with them too. I've never heard of a black brahma I bet he's beautiful, like with my Black Jersey Giant they're late to mature. Someone told me it takes at least two years to reach full maturity.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flock Leader View Post
 

Also, I wonder if mating-readiness will also bring the typical rooster "gentlemanly" behavior - watching over the flock, calling the hens to food, etc? My previous rooster (who fell prey to a fox) was really wonderful in that respect. He'd even show the hens good places to lay eggs. Whenever he found a place that he considered to be a good, discreet spot for laying, he'd call a hen over, sit in the chosen spot, and start softly clucking (just like a broody hen). The hens would then lay in those places. It was amazing to watch. 

My Faverolles hadn't started any of that yet...I think he may have been a little "special", to tell the truth :rolleyes:

 

I do have a mixed breed cockerel (Tom) who is maturing and learning to call for treats, alert the hens, things like that. Thing is, they are used to the mature rooster and basically ignore him, poor guy! I'll be tossing out treats and he'll be on the outskirts of the flock calling and calling, and the hens are clustered around the older male just eating away, he's all by his lonesome. And, he alerts pretty much at the drop of a hat, so they ignore that, too. He's a bundle of hormones and doesn't get much of the concept of courting yet, he's more a grab hold and try to hang on guy right now. It's pretty funny to watch the interactions between him, the older rooster, the older hens, and the pullets. And my family asks what I do all day---I watch my chickens, that's what I do!

 

I've only had one rooster in the past who would nest for the hens, and it was Tom's father. Now, Tom is starting to show the same behavior. Unfortunately, he's picked the feed barrels as the primo spot for the pullets to lay :/. He perches on the edge and calls them and talks to them until they come check it out, then he hangs out right around the barrel while they settle in. Funny what behaviors are inherited!

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

Just wanted to update and say that the rooster started mating shortly after I posted this thread, and the first broods of chicks have already been hatched! 

A wife and mother enjoying a simple life with her family and chickens and blogging about it here. One husband, three kids, two cats, four pigeons and a small mixed flock of a rooster and a fluctuating number of hens. 
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A wife and mother enjoying a simple life with her family and chickens and blogging about it here. One husband, three kids, two cats, four pigeons and a small mixed flock of a rooster and a fluctuating number of hens. 
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post #14 of 14

:thumbsup

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
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