New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

More Dying Chicks

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Howdy! My wife and I have successfully raised chicks before, but this time, not so. We are starting our 5th day after receiving 25, and now we are down to 15. I read the other posts but never saw anything on dirt or gravel. Could it be that our brooders are too clean? I'm guessing that the chicks digestive systems are becoming bound, so I added something to help with grinding the food. I'll keep you posted, but anybody else want to weigh in on this?

post #2 of 7
A couple years back, when first starting I purchased chicks from a feed store that also sold me some sand/cat bedding and insisted that if I wanted a smell free environment it works wonders. Being new I was sold. My chicks turned out fine but I did read later on that little pebble like bedding is bad for chicks because they might mix it up with their food and depending on where the dirt is from and what kind of organic matter is in it, that might also be a problem. I'd like to see what others say on this too.
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicks2eggs View Post
 

Howdy! My wife and I have successfully raised chicks before, but this time, not so. We are starting our 5th day after receiving 25, and now we are down to 15. I read the other posts but never saw anything on dirt or gravel. Could it be that our brooders are too clean? I'm guessing that the chicks digestive systems are becoming bound, so I added something to help with grinding the food. I'll keep you posted, but anybody else want to weigh in on this?

With chick crumbles, you do not need to add grit, until they get on grass and other foods. This time of year is a bit cold for chick shipping IMHO. It depends on what climate they travel in and how long in transit of course. Many chicks become cold, dehydrated, and stressed in shipping. They develop pasty butt, and may need that cleaned for the first week. Do you have them in a brooder with a heat lamp for chicks, at around 90 degrees with a thermometer on the floor? They need a cooler spot to escape to if overheated. Sorry for your losses, but when stressed they need to drink water with electrolytes and vitamins, or SaveAChick. Here is a good link to read about stress and shipping:

http://www.upc-online.org/transport/71408shippingbirds.html

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tips, NeseO and Eggcessive. Yes, we do have them under heat lamps with escape-from-the-heat options. We're keeping it between 90 and 95, and they seem content with this. We have been giving them vitamins and electrolytes added to their water. I'm pleased to report that we have had no more casualties since the introduction of sand. I'll keep you posted as they progress. Thanks again!

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicks2eggs View Post

Thanks for the tips, NeseO and Eggcessive. Yes, we do have them under heat lamps with escape-from-the-heat options. We're keeping it between 90 and 95, and they seem content with this. We have been giving them vitamins and electrolytes added to their water. I'm pleased to report that we have had no more casualties since the introduction of sand. I'll keep you posted as they progress. Thanks again!
That is great news:)
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

Well, it's been 3 days and 13 hours since my original post, and I'm happy to report that there have been no new casualties. I'm not going to speculate that it was the sand that saved them, for I suspect that they were stressed during shipment and that's what took its toll on the ten that died. However, the survivors did gobble up a bunch of the stuff as soon as I poured it in there. All I can ascertain is that it didn't hurt. Thanks again for the suggestions.

post #7 of 7
Glad the rest are doing well. I can imagine shipping can be very stressful, nobody but the carriers know how they are really handled. Have a wonderful weekend!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home