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Favorite Tomato - Page 10

post #91 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by SittinDuck View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris09 View Post
 

It doesn't matter if the wood chips are in the soil or on the soil they still rob nitrogen from the soil the only difference is weather it takes nitrogen with in the soil or from the top few inches of the soil.

Wood chips much like saw dust also has a acidifying affect so pH also has to be watched also.

 

Wood chips are big, so I can't see it being a big problem.

 

 

From left to right: potting soil, 100% wood chips, 100% crushed limestone, 100% play sand, dirt/compost mix, compost.

 

All planted at the same time.

 

If wood chips were that big of a problem, a plant shouldn't be able to grow in 100% wood chips.  They would surely suck up all nitrogen, but they don't.

 

Plants also grow in 100% lime and 100% sand.  The nitrogen seems to come from the air.

 

(The wood chips look black because they've been wet for a few weeks.)

 

It's important to note that I am not adding wood chips to my garden, I am adding the lignin in the wood chips and accepting the undesirable effects of the wood as a consequence to a greater good in the end.  I expect those undesirable effects to be minimal, and so far, that has been my impression.

 

How long have they been in the containers with this medium?

I see tomatoes in all stages of growth, from 3 days or so on the far left to about 2 to 3 months old on the right. (hard to tell age well since there lanky and look to be stretching for light)

If you just transplanted them into this medium about two weeks ago your not going to tell much yet..

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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post #92 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris09 View Post
 

 

How long have they been in the containers with this medium?

I see tomatoes in all stages of growth, from 3 days or so on the far left to about 2 to 3 months old on the right. (hard to tell age well since there lanky and look to be stretching for light)

If you just transplanted them into this medium about two weeks ago your not going to tell much yet..

 

They were all the same age (probably a month).  There would be no point in the experiment if they were all different ages.

 

I planted the seeds in a teaspoon of dirt on top of the wood chips, sand, lime.  They are lanky because I used cfls.

 

That pic is 3 years old, so I forgot a few particulars.

 

The plant in the lime, I kept it for a long time.  Maybe 4-5 months before I got bored looking at it.  It never grew bigger than that pic, but it never died until I stopped watering it.  The fact that it lived at all was amazing.

post #93 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by SittinDuck View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris09 View Post
 

 

How long have they been in the containers with this medium?

I see tomatoes in all stages of growth, from 3 days or so on the far left to about 2 to 3 months old on the right. (hard to tell age well since there lanky and look to be stretching for light)

If you just transplanted them into this medium about two weeks ago your not going to tell much yet..

 

They were all the same age (probably a month).  There would be no point in the experiment if they were all different ages.

 

I planted the seeds in a teaspoon of dirt on top of the wood chips, sand, lime.  They are lanky because I used cfls.

 

That pic is 3 years old, so I forgot a few particulars.

 

The plant in the lime, I kept it for a long time.  Maybe 4-5 months before I got bored looking at it.  It never grew bigger than that pic, but it never died until I stopped watering it.  The fact that it lived at all was amazing.

So your saying that the little tomatoes on the far left that just barely has true leaves is the same age as the tomatoes on the far right?

Sorry, I just don't see all 6 of those tomatoes being the same age.

 

Your cfl's weren't putting out enough lumens so they started stretching for light and in turn they got lanky and aren't as green as they should be. 

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

Reply

 

NPIP # 31-516
Society for the Preservation of Poultry Antiquities http://sppa.webs.com/

Breeding Large Fowl Single and Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds to APA Standard


"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares." – 

George Washington

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post #94 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris09 View Post
 

So your saying that the little tomatoes on the far left that just barely has true leaves is the same age as the tomatoes on the far right?

Sorry, I just don't see all 6 of those tomatoes being the same age.

 

Your cfl's weren't putting out enough lumens so they started stretching for light and in turn they got lanky and aren't as green as they should be. 

 

You could be right about the one on the far left in the potting soil.  It's been 3 years, but now that you mention it, I think I remember starting the experiment and then finding a bag of potting soil at Dollar General, so the one on the far left could be a week younger.  I think I included it in the pic because it was remarkable just how slow it grew.   But the rest, I can say with 100% confidence that they are all the same age.

 

Try the experiment yourself and see what you come up with.  You have better lights anyway.  In a few months, we will know for sure.  What are we trying to know again?

post #95 of 96

Our favorite by far is Black Krim. Very similar to Cherokee Purple. Both are super dark and meaty heirlooms. I've had little success with starting my tomatoes from seeds so I just buy plants and call it good.

.Tomato_Black_krim_Plants.jpg

Our coop build thread...

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088771/cheryls-hen-house

 

1Peter 5:2 Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God.

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Our coop build thread...

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088771/cheryls-hen-house

 

1Peter 5:2 Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God.

Reply
post #96 of 96

I like the early girl tomatoes.  This year I have two different kinds of cherry tomatoes started from seeds in the house.  I don't have a lot of sun here but they are doing pretty good.  Their about 3 inches tall.  Now if I can keep them alive until May when I can plant them outside.

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