New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Red tinted albumen

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I have 2 layer hens (and a rooster) Recently I have gotten a couple of eggs with red-tinted albumen from them. What might be the cause of this? The eggs were fresh, it was not the red spot of a fertilized egg, but red strands running all through. They eat mainly commercial layer feed with some plant material tossed in and whatever bugs or lizards stray into their coop. I threw the eggs out a couple times but the last time I just used it anyway, it seems to have been OK. 

post #2 of 5

It sounds like there may be a bit of blood in the albumen. Have a look here: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/common-egg-quality-problems

 

“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.” 

 

~ Shel Silverstein
 

Reply

 

“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.” 

 

~ Shel Silverstein
 

Reply
post #3 of 5
Blood in eggs is often causes by the hens bumping or knocking into things, flighty birds are more prone to them due to how easy they get startled and over react to things, it's usually caused by broken blood vessels.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #4 of 5

Blood in egg is usually from a broken blood vessel when the ova is released from ovary.

It's often just a spot of red or brown on the yolk or in the albumen, has nothing to do with fertilization.

 

It can be more than just a spot tho, I've gotten a couple pretty bloody eggs.

 

As long as it doesn't happen often it's just a glitch,

tho it will make you break eggs into a separate container instead of directly into pan or recipe for awhile.

 

 

The video link is an excellent example of the egg formation process, and clearly shows and explains the 'blood in egg' issue.

Egg Formation Video

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

Hey, thanks for all the responses. Somehow I didn't get notification of them so I didn't see it til I came back just now.

It's only been a couple eggs so I guess it's nothing to worry about. Thanks again :)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying