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how do black australorps: I differentiate a cock from hens at 9 weeks old

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
From the begining, I want to ensure that I keep exactly the ratios on my 200 blach australorp birds. Am however failing to differentiate a cock from a hen. Please help. Also, help me with good qualities of a parent stock
post #2 of 7

:welcome

Welcome!

Wow! 200 is a lot of birds!

 

There is varying consensus on what is a good ratio of roosters to hens. If they are going to be separated into breeding pens with one rooster in each then most people prefer a 4:1 ratio to a 6:1 ratio.

If you are not dividing them up, a higher ratio of around 10:1 is better to prevent fighting among the roosters.

 

If you are having trouble differentiating between roos and pullets, you are welcome to post photos and the BYC community will help you sex them. I also recommend posting some pics on this thread and read the first few posts :

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/944086/the-big-fat-is-this-a-rooster-thread

 

Typically roosters will be more dominant and have larger redder combs at this age.

 

Good qualities in parent stock depend on what you're looking to breed for :

Are you looking to breed for SOP?

Egg production?

Dual purpose birds?

Egg size?

Good temperament? 


Edited by XxMingirlxX - 2/13/16 at 4:01am
Four lovely hens : An Exbattery Hen, a Lavender Araucana, a Wheaten Marans and a Gold Laced Frizzle Polish
Two dogs and four cats.
If you want to read my chicken adventure, here it is :
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/947562/my-story-our-experience-join-me-on-my-adventure.
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Four lovely hens : An Exbattery Hen, a Lavender Araucana, a Wheaten Marans and a Gold Laced Frizzle Polish
Two dogs and four cats.
If you want to read my chicken adventure, here it is :
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/947562/my-story-our-experience-join-me-on-my-adventure.
Reply
post #3 of 7

:welcome  glad you have joined us.

 

I only have a few pet hens, cannot imaging tending a flock that size.  

Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

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Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

Reply
post #4 of 7

Welcome to BYC! I'm glad you joined us! :)

I set fire to the rain! Watch it pour as I, touched your face. Well it burn while I cried, because I heard it screaming out your name. And I threw us into flames. I knew that was the last time, the last time...I set fire to the rain! -Adele

 

Look at my flock page! http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bantamfan4lifes-flock

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I set fire to the rain! Watch it pour as I, touched your face. Well it burn while I cried, because I heard it screaming out your name. And I threw us into flames. I knew that was the last time, the last time...I set fire to the rain! -Adele

 

Look at my flock page! http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bantamfan4lifes-flock

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post #5 of 7
Hello!

Welcome to BYC and the coop! There's a lot of great peeps here! Feel free to ask lots of questions. But most of all, make yourself at home. I'm so glad you decided to joined the BYC family. I look forward to seeing you around BYC.
Did a moth know that the flame was going to change her life forever, or did she simply fly towards that heated embrace, knowing it would offer her something she couldn't give herself? In the end, the answer didn't really matter. The moth had never wanted the choice. -Joey W. Hill-
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Did a moth know that the flame was going to change her life forever, or did she simply fly towards that heated embrace, knowing it would offer her something she couldn't give herself? In the end, the answer didn't really matter. The moth had never wanted the choice. -Joey W. Hill-
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post #6 of 7

A male generally has a larger, redder comb early,  whereas  females usually don't get  larger and redder till they are close to laying eggs.  You can also post photos of ones you suspect are males   at  "what breed or gender is this."  That should  give you a basis to judge females against.

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                                         Please visit  "Current Movies - Thumbs UP or Thumbs DOWN"pop.gif

                                                           Movie  reviews    & comments -   welcome                                                 

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post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thanks XXMa. The Male to female ration and qualities have been sorted out. I need my Birds as Parent Stock. They will be laying eggs for incubation. I have 100 at 9 weeks and 55 at 4 weeks. My target is to keep 300 clean birds, I deal for the said purpose. Please help ASAP. I will be selling all that do not qualify the said criteria so that I don't just waste feed on them.
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