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Should my Flemish rabbit have a FRIEND?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I have mixed emotions and am conflicted about getting a companion bunny for my rabbit. I want him to have a friend for times I am not home and he needs company. (He's an indoor rabbit, roaming free). When I am home, he gets tons of affection from me. But when I am not home, I worry he might be lonely. I want him to be happy and not depressed (if he ever is) about not having a playmate. But if he ever gets sick and dies, that will leave the newer bunny alone and grieving. Then I will have to get ANOTHER bunny as a companion for that one..... and the cycle keeps repeating itself. Does anyone else think about stuff like this? I'm so confused about this! What should I do??

post #2 of 7
Some rabbits enjoy company, some really don't care. We've kept singles and multiples. In my experience, in a pet situation rather then a breeding situation obviously, it's been easier when they are raised together, rather then introducing new adults. If your rabbit is not neutered you'll want to do that before attempting to get him a friend. Then a careful introduction process would be needed with lots of supervision when they are eventually together. Fights can break out instantly and rabbits can do an awful lot of damage in no time at all. If you are lucky they will bond and become buddies but it doesn't always work out that way lol. You would just have to give a try and see how things go. I have a pair of does currently, both are spayed. They are the same age and were raised together but given the chance they would fight now and then. Each has her own hutch and exercise yard and they seem to enjoy the presence of the other most of the time but each bun has her own home space and they seem to prefer it that way.
wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the good response. 

post #4 of 7
I think most rabbits tend to tolerate company rather than enjoy it. In the wild, rabbits are not social creatures per say. They live in large groups but they are fairly territorial about their space. I don't really consider that social behavior though, more like "forced to live near each other".

I don't think your rabbit is lonely, especially if he has free range of your whole house. I generally discourage introducing new rabbits to an existing rabbit because the results can be horrific and even deadly. Even rabbits raised together can suddenly decide to fight one day after years of being peaceful. The people I have known that kept two rabbits together have been people that had a male/female pair and both were fixed.

Some people keep colony type set ups and that can work sometimes, but I think that is better for a production type setup rather than a pet setup.
"If we long for our planet to be important, there is something we can do about it. We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and by the depth of our answers." ~Carl Sagan

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"If we long for our planet to be important, there is something we can do about it. We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and by the depth of our answers." ~Carl Sagan

"We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem." ~Douglas Adams
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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 


That makes sense. Thanks for the response.

post #6 of 7

If you haven't done so already, just get your rabbit some toys.

The obscure we understand eventually. 
The obvious takes a little longer.
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The obscure we understand eventually. 
The obvious takes a little longer.
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post #7 of 7
I advise against getting a companion. We breed, flemish and always assure buyers that they are happy alone. They can become territorial with others, even when" fixed". As long as it gets plenty of attention from you, has toys to occupy it, and is showing all signs ofgood health, your doing fine. They are amazing animals, they just dont socialize much with other rabbits. The best way to have more than one is to purchase litter mates and spay both early. Every rabbit is different, but this will increase your chance of success.
Family and i keep 3 dark brahmas, 2 new hampshire, 3 australorp, a silver laced wyandotte, a speckled sussex, 2 EE, 2 pekin ducks, 8 turkeys,4 flemish giant rabbits, 4 dogs, great pyr, lab and min pins, 1 cat. And 1 aquarium.
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Family and i keep 3 dark brahmas, 2 new hampshire, 3 australorp, a silver laced wyandotte, a speckled sussex, 2 EE, 2 pekin ducks, 8 turkeys,4 flemish giant rabbits, 4 dogs, great pyr, lab and min pins, 1 cat. And 1 aquarium.
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