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Dying Hens - Page 2

post #11 of 14

Ok, so you don't have breeds that will prolapse easily or lay themselves to death (no comets). 

"In the field of observation, chance favors only the prepared mind"

~Louis Pasteur

 

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 Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care.  (Matthew 10:29)

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"In the field of observation, chance favors only the prepared mind"

~Louis Pasteur

 

>NPIP certified<

 

Fear kills more dreams than failure ever will.

 

 Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care.  (Matthew 10:29)

Reply
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by carrierose View Post
 

They have water all the time along with a ditch flowing in our pasture so I believe they are getting plenty of water.  I normally feed Payback layer pellets.  This past winter I changed that up a bit because of the way they were molting (started in July 2015 & some are still molting).  In December I changed to the Rogue All in One feed (18% protein) and added soybean meal to total 30% protein. The chickens started dying before I changed their feed. I have now switched back to the Payback layer pellets (17% protein). My chickens are not overweight. I watch this carefully & their butts are not plugged. 

 

The bug problem started in the fall of 2013 & I tried everything that was suggested to me to get it stopped.  Nothing worked.  Fumigating with the Adams bug bomb was the last resort.  The chickens suffered with feather mites, spider mites, lice and a third type of mite that I cannot remember the name of.  Went for 2 years with featherless chickens because I could not get the problem solved until I bombed the coop.

If they started molting in July and still molting - they aren't molting. I would think the parasite problem is back.

 

30% protein is too high for adult chickens for any significant amount of time (over a couple weeks). It can cause liver and kidney problems and lead to articular gout.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by carrierose View Post
 


We are located in southern Oregon.  I wish I could take a chicken to a vet or even get a necropsy done.  Unfortunately, this just isn't in our budget at this time as my husband is not working full time.  His job is a seasonal thing. 


I'm with you on budget. I haven't worked in a long time and vets are expensive. However, on the necropsy, some states are free. That may be the case in Oregon.

Losing birds to unknown causes is hard on the budget too.

Oregon State University

Veterinary Diagnostic Lab

Magruder Hall 134

Corvallis, Oregon 97331

Phone: 541-737-3261 Fax 541-737-6817

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 


Our weather last July was very cold & conducive to triggering a molt.  My chickens were not the only ones to start molting last July. Everyone I know that has chickens had the same problem.  I trust the chicken expert at our local feed store because she has been around chickens all her life & has over 60 chickens of her own.  Because of the bug problem I've had I check my chickens regularly & I find no parasites on any of them now. Thank you Chicken Canoe for the information from the Oregon State University.  I will give them a call.  Our local chicken vet said a necropsy was $132.50 & the chicken would have to be sent out.  Maybe going directly to the University will be less expensive.

I want to protect the 40 chickens I have left & get the problem solved before I get my meat birds in a couple months.

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by carrierose View Post
 


Our weather last July was very cold & conducive to triggering a molt.  My chickens were not the only ones to start molting last July. Everyone I know that has chickens had the same problem.  I trust the chicken expert at our local feed store because she has been around chickens all her life & has over 60 chickens of her own.  Because of the bug problem I've had I check my chickens regularly & I find no parasites on any of them now. Thank you Chicken Canoe for the information from the Oregon State University.  I will give them a call.  Our local chicken vet said a necropsy was $132.50 & the chicken would have to be sent out.  Maybe going directly to the University will be less expensive.

I want to protect the 40 chickens I have left & get the problem solved before I get my meat birds in a couple months.

Much less expensive.
And most of that money goes to the vet and all they do is package the carcass.

 

That's about the price vets around here charge. The MO University charges $85 for a complete round of diagnostics. With today's gas prices, it was cheaper for me to take the 7 hour round trip drive than to mail it.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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