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Do I have an aggressive rooster? - Page 4

post #31 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by keesmom View Post

I knew the current one was an oops. I got the mistaken impression you were going to try to replace him, that's all. If you aren't concerned about egg production, and are looking for kid-friendly choices, then Cochins, silkies and Faverolles hens would be good choices. My kids have pet silkies, LF Cochins and have made pets out of some of my Faverolles breeders. They also have a social Buttercup, buff Minorca and brown Leghorn that don't mind being carried around.
oh no. Didn't want to replace, we are just unlucky getting roos.... Our first 6 chicks were silkies, one hen I still have, but 3 roos in that batch so I sold pairs and then the last roo was killed by a hawk recently sad.png.... Now I know to make sure I get sexed chickens!!! Will definitely take yalls advice on the Cochin's and the others, thanks!!
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by cafarmgirl View Post

Don't underestimate the problem here with your 3 year old and this rooster.  Adults can learn to "read" a roosters behavior, learn when he's thinking about attacking and react appropriately.  A 3 year old child is not capable of this in my opinion.  Also they are smaller, tend to make quick movements, maybe loud noises, roosters just tend to want to go after them before they'll go after an adult, easier target.  Children are short, they are at much greater risk of serious injury with a large rooster who jumps up, attempts to spur and maybe pecks as well.  It's just not worth keeping a bird like that around and risking an eye injury or other injury to your child. 

As far as your pair of Silkies?  Yes he will continue to attempt to dominate the male and take possession of the hen.  Silkies are often not a good match to be housed with standard breed roosters.

To be honest, I'd not be spending time trying to reform this bird, a rooster has natural ingrained tendencies and some of them can be pretty nasty.  If you are lucky enough to get a nice rooster that's great, but a nasty one is just not a good combination with small children.

I completely agree with all of the above. Many eye injuries are permanent. Once a rooster shows aggression towards any of my children - they have to go.
post #33 of 39

Handling them when they are chicks will help a lot too. You really won't be able to tell gender until much later but if you handle all, I have found that it helps the rooster's temperament much better too.

"In the field of observation, chance favors only the prepared mind"

~Louis Pasteur

 

>NPIP certified<

 

Fear kills more dreams than failure ever will.

 

 Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care.  (Matthew 10:29)

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"In the field of observation, chance favors only the prepared mind"

~Louis Pasteur

 

>NPIP certified<

 

Fear kills more dreams than failure ever will.

 

 Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care.  (Matthew 10:29)

Reply
post #34 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockyFieldsFarm View Post

I completely agree with all of the above. Many eye injuries are permanent. Once a rooster shows aggression towards any of my children - they have to go.
I've already made plans to try to rehome him, I definitely don't want to be looking over my shoulder constantly!!
post #35 of 39

I'm sorry if I came across as too harsh. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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post #36 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by donrae View Post

I'm sorry if I came across as too harsh. 
thank you, it's OK..... I realize I don't know what I'm doing yet, which is why I'm asking yall's advice...just felt like I was being bashed for being a dummy and I'm a little sensitive about it anyway since my daughter got hurt. I've gotten ALOT of great advice about the matter from everyone and I see no reason to keep him if I'm the slightest concerned about his behavior smile.png... So on to more hens!!!
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by CochinLover1 View Post
 

Handling them when they are chicks will help a lot too. You really won't be able to tell gender until much later but if you handle all, I have found that it helps the rooster's temperament much better too.


I have actually had the opposite experience.  When I was new to chickens I handled my young roo's a lot as they grew up thinking that would make them tame, and they were, until the hormones hit at about 6 months or so.  Then because they had absolutely no natural fear or respect for me they were really awful.  After that I did not handle them, coddle or spoil them in any way.  Since then the roo's that I've kept have been much more respectful and decent.  But I still would not keep a rooster with small children around who wanted to be part of the chicken keeping.  To me it's just not worth it.

wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by cafarmgirl View Post
 


I have actually had the opposite experience.  When I was new to chickens I handled my young roo's a lot as they grew up thinking that would make them tame, and they were, until the hormones hit at about 6 months or so.  Then because they had absolutely no natural fear or respect for me they were really awful.  After that I did not handle them, coddle or spoil them in any way.  Since then the roo's that I've kept have been much more respectful and decent.  But I still would not keep a rooster with small children around who wanted to be part of the chicken keeping.  To me it's just not worth it.


That surprises me! It's made a world of difference for me, less flighty, and a lot more friendly! Maybe the breeds are different, and I mean, every bird is different.

"In the field of observation, chance favors only the prepared mind"

~Louis Pasteur

 

>NPIP certified<

 

Fear kills more dreams than failure ever will.

 

 Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care.  (Matthew 10:29)

Reply

"In the field of observation, chance favors only the prepared mind"

~Louis Pasteur

 

>NPIP certified<

 

Fear kills more dreams than failure ever will.

 

 Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care.  (Matthew 10:29)

Reply
post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by CochinLover1 View Post

Handling them when they are chicks will help a lot too. You really won't be able to tell gender until much later but if you handle all, I have found that it helps the rooster's temperament much better too.
I haven't read the whole thread, so correct me if I'm wrong, from my experience handling young roosters will lead to more aggression than having them grow with a healthy fear of you. They are more likely to see you as part of their flock and attempt to dominate you when they become sexually mature.

I don't think ever mixing roosters and children is a good idea, especially younger children, their jerky movements and loud yelling can trigger attacks from a rooster.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
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