New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Winter Blues

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I am from the state of Iowa which has all four seasons to the extreme. Now is winter and like every other winter the temperatures can never make up their mind and range from -30 to 30. One thing that does seem to stay the same is that once it gets cold, the birds slow to a crawl for egg production. I had thought it was the breed that I had so I had a comparison one year on the different species from the flock and found that the Austrolorps and RIR did the best but still slowed production during the winter. I need tips! Diet, breed, superstitions or anything else that I can try to get the birds to lay better.

post #2 of 7

I have Jersey Giants and I'm getting about 2 eggs a day from 7 hens. Some of the guys at work said to give them cat food and it'll help boost egg production. I thought it was strange so all I did was increase their feed and added mealworms as treats. Along with oyster shells. with that I got my production over the last few weeks to 4 a day. So I'm wondering if its really worth it. I think we are in the same boat. :th 

post #3 of 7

How old are your birds? 

 

It's not so much temp, as length of daylight. have you looked into supplemental lighting?

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #4 of 7
Switching to a higher protein feed can help them get through a molt quicker and them resume laying sooner, as well as keeping them laying, especially if you are feeding anything more besides a ration.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by donrae View Post
 

How old are your birds? 

 

It's not so much temp, as length of daylight. have you looked into supplemental lighting?

Exactly!

Pullets will often lay thru their first winter....hens, not so much...even with supplemental lighting.

Lots of variables.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhenlikesdogs View Post

Switching to a higher protein feed can help them get through a molt quicker and them resume laying sooner, as well as keeping them laying, especially if you are feeding anything more besides a ration.

Yep!

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

They are going on 3 years with 18% crumbles and mild lighting all day. I have no scratch additives which I have heard makes a difference, the bedding is somewhat old but the water also stays half full no matter what. 

post #7 of 7
Going on three means unfortunately they won't lay as much this year, the first two years are the best, by three and four production can be cut in half in some hens and by five or six many will have quit laying with a few continuing for another year or two sporadically laying. Your best bet for continual eggs is to add a few new chicks each spring or summer, or at least every two years.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying