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Are they safe to eat?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Our free range chicken found sitting on 12 eggs! ( long story but she was left by neighbors about 2 years ago and I have always fed her and she slowly has become "ours") She went missing for 3-4 days ( she usually roosts in the tree by my "captive" girls coop which are young and have not started laying as of yet) and when I followed her today we found she had a nest of 12 yes 12 eggs. They are all perfect looking but we live in Texas and it has been very warm, in the 70's and low 80's for weeks. I know she didn't lay them in the last 3-4 days! did she? We collected them and were wondering if they would be safe to eat? We have no roosters and we live in the country and are surrounded by 400 acres which run only cattle so no worry about them being fertile.  Thanks..

post #2 of 4

Hi! Chances are, some or most  are still good. Here's a link to float test them for freshness. 

http://www.wikihow.com/Tell-if-an-Egg-is-Bad

Walk gently on this earth. Do no harm. Laugh a lot at yourself. Be kind even when it's  hard.
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Walk gently on this earth. Do no harm. Laugh a lot at yourself. Be kind even when it's  hard.
Reply
post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Thank you @Mutt Farm. I will try that :-)
post #4 of 4

Just because an egg floats, doesn't mean it's 'bad'.

Just means it's older, as the air cell increases in size as the egg dehydrates.

 

Sniff test...smell the egg before breaking,

if it doesn't stink.... break it open in a dish and take a look and another sniff.

Do each egg separately in dish before adding into pan or recipe.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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