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Our new baby chick's

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
How long until my baby chicks can go outside and stay in the coop?
post #2 of 6

When chicks have there adult feathers ( 6-7 weeks) You can take them out of the brooder but to be save I'd leave the heat lamb in for another week or so.  Hope I'm right.

post #3 of 6
I would let them go outside around 7-8 weeks but however would not leave them outside unless it is warm.
post #4 of 6

Chicks are fully feathered at 4-5 weeks.  Many people, including myself, move them into their coop/run at that age.  If it is very cold where you are you might put a heat lamp up for them at first so they can warm up if needed while they get used to the temps. 

wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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post #5 of 6
WELCOME TO BYC!

Make sure to check out the learning centre! There is tons of good info there.

When chicks go out depends largely on your management style and weather.

I generally put my chicks out in the coop ( in a brooder section where they can be seen by everyone) with a heat source at around 3-4 weeks. I live in Wisconsin and often have them out side in early spring with some nights dipping down into the 20's. right now I am using the Mama Heating pad method and am loving it. http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/956958/mama-heating-pad-in-the-brooder-picture-heavy-update

I find they finish feathering out quicker, integrate with the flock easier. They are also exposed to germs outside at a younger age and develop better immunities in my experience. Plus there is a lot less odors and chicken dust to deal with inside then.

There are some who put their chicks outside right from the start. I really only keep them inside so long because I find them entertaining and they bond better with people.

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors
Edited by Paganrose - 2/23/16 at 12:27pm

Homesteading on a 6 acre hobby farm in Southern Wisconsin. Raising a gifted child, A barnyard mix of chickens, Icelandic sheep, A sweet elderly pitty bull, a few barn cats, and a large garden.  

 

 

History Geek- Medieval reenactment, fiber arts and cooking, and natural architectural nut.

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Homesteading on a 6 acre hobby farm in Southern Wisconsin. Raising a gifted child, A barnyard mix of chickens, Icelandic sheep, A sweet elderly pitty bull, a few barn cats, and a large garden.  

 

 

History Geek- Medieval reenactment, fiber arts and cooking, and natural architectural nut.

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post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thank you so much, I'm so excited about raising them
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